Ohio Archives for 2016-11

UPDATED 4:30 PM - Ohio State Attacker Identified; Man of Somalian Descent

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Latest on reports of an active shooter on the Ohio State University campus (all times local):

 

4:30 p.m.

 

Authorities say the officer who killed an attacker at Ohio State University was a university police officer who'd been on the job for less than two years.

 

Department of Public Safety Director Monica Moll identified the officer as 28-year-old Alan Horujko. She says he started on the Ohio State police force in January 2015.

 

Ohio State Police Chief Craig Stone says it was fortunate there was a nearby gas leak that the officer had gone to investigate. Stone says it helped position Horujko to respond to the attack so quickly.

 

Those injured in the attack included an Ohio State faculty member, four graduate students and three undergrads.

 

Authorities say they were able to get photos of the suspect's vehicle driving onto campus and confirmed only one person was in the car.

 

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4:10 p.m.

 

A director of public safety says a man who drove a car into pedestrians and began stabbing people at Ohio State was a student at the school.

 

Ohio State Department of Public Safety Director Monica Moll also identified the now-deceased suspect as Abdul Razak Ali Artan.

 

A U.S. official earlier told The Associated Press that he was born in Somalia and living in the United States as a legal permanent resident. The official wasn't authorized to publicly discuss details of the ongoing case and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

 

Authorities say Artan was shot to death by a police officer Monday morning shortly after he drove up onto a curb into pedestrians, got out of the car and began stabbing people with a butcher knife.

 

Nine people were injured, including one critically.

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3:20 p.m.

 

A U.S. official has identified the suspect in the Ohio State attack that injured nine people as a man of Somali descent.

 

The official identified Abdul Razak Ali Artan as the now-deceased suspect. He was born in Somalia and living in the United States as a legal permanent resident. It was unclear when Artan came to the U.S.

 

The official wasn't authorized to publicly discuss details of the ongoing case and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

 

A second law enforcement official confirmed that authorities believe the suspect's name is Abdul Artan. That official also wasn't authorized to publicly discuss details of the ongoing case and spoke on condition of anonymity.

 

Authorities say the suspect was shot to death Monday by a police officer after driving up onto a curb and into pedestrians and attacking people with a knife.

 

— Associated Press writers Alicia A. Caldwell and Eric Tucker in Washington contributed to this report.

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3 p.m.

 

A police chief says authorities are looking into whether the attack at Ohio State University was related to terrorism.

 

Columbus Police Chief Kim Jacobs was asked at a news conference Monday afternoon whether authorities were considering the possibility that it was a terror attack.

 

Jacobs says, "I think we have to consider that it is."

 

Authorities say a man purposely plowed his car over a curb and into pedestrians on Monday morning before jumping out of the car and attacking people with a butcher knife. A police officer who was nearby because of an earlier gas leak was on the scene in a minute and shot and killed the attacker.

 

The FBI and other agencies joined the investigation.

 

Authorities say nine people were hurt, one of them critically.

 

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1:50 p.m.

 

A witness to an attack at Ohio State University says he initially thought a car had driven over a curb into pedestrians accidentally but realized it was intentional when a man emerged with a butcher knife.

 

Student Martin Schneider says he saw the attack take place Monday morning.

 

He says he saw the attacker hit several people with the car, then emerge swinging the knife.

 

Schneider says the attacker didn't say anything.

 

He says he heard the car's engine revving before it hit the curb because it was going pretty fast. He says he also heard yells from a frightened crowd.

 

Ohio State Police Chief Craig Stone says an officer who was nearby because of an earlier gas leak shot and killed the attacker.

 

Nine people were taken to hospitals.

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1:20 p.m.

Authorities are now saying nine people were injured at Ohio State University when an attacker purposely drove over a curb and into pedestrians and then got out of the vehicle and began stabbing people with a butcher knife.

Ohio State Police Chief Craig Stone says eight of the victims are in stable condition and one victim is in critical condition after the attack Monday. Authorities said two people had been stabbed, four people had been hurt by a car and two others were treated for lacerations.

The injuries to the ninth person weren't immediately clear.

Earlier, hospital officials said that eight people had non-life-threatening injuries.

Stone says an officer who was nearby because of an earlier gas leak shot and killed the male suspect.

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1:10 p.m.

 

Ohio State police say the attacker on campus purposely drove over a curb and into pedestrians and then got out of the vehicle and began stabbing people with a butcher knife.

 

Police Chief Craig Stone spoke early Monday afternoon at a news conference.

 

Authorities also said police believe that there was only one attacker. Ohio State said earlier that the suspect had been shot and killed. 9 non-life-threatening injuries reported aby Ohio State University officials.

 

The university had sent out a series of tweets at around 10 a.m. Monday saying there was an active shooter on campus and that shooters should run, hide or fight. About an hour and a half later, the university said a shelter-in-place warning had been lifted and the scene was secure.

 

Authorities said later that it doesn't appear that the suspect used a gun in the attack.

 

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12:50 p.m.

 

A spokesman for Ohio State University says a suspect in an attack on campus that injured at least eight people has been shot and killed.

 

Ben Johnson also said Monday that injuries in the attack included stab wounds and being struck by a vehicle.

 

A law enforcement official told The Associated Press that the suspect is believed to have initially struck people with a car before beginning to stab victims. There was no indication that the suspect shot anyone. The official wasn't authorized to discuss an ongoing investigation by name and spoke on condition of anonymity.

 

The details started to emerge after a morning of confusion and conflicting reports that began with the university issuing tweets warning students that there was an "active shooter" on campus near the engineering building and that they should "run, hide, fight."

 

12:15 p.m.

 

A spokesman for Ohio State University says a suspect in attack on campus has been shot and killed and injuries in the attack on campus included stab wounds and being struck by a vehicle.

 

Ben Johnson said Monday that there were also other injuries that were being evaluated.

 

He says campus will remain open, but classes will be canceled for the rest of the day.

 

The university had sent a series of tweets at around 10 a.m. Monday saying there was an active shooter on campus and that students should run, hide or fight. About an hour and a half later, the university said a shelter-in-place warning had been lifted and the scene was secure.

 

At least eight people have been sent to hospitals.

 

The fate of any suspect or suspects wasn't immediately clear.

 

12:05 p.m.

 

Hospital officials say eight patients they received from the scene of a reported attack at Ohio State University have non-life-threatening injuries.

 

The eight patients were split among OSU Wexner Medical Center, OhioHealth Grant Medical Center and OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital.

 

The university had warned students in a series of tweets earlier Monday that there was an active shooter on campus and that they should run, hide or fight. About an hour and a half later, the university said a shelter-in-place warning had been lifted and the scene was secure.

 

The fire department had earlier said that seven people had been taken to hospitals.

 

It wasn't immediately clear if a suspect or suspects in the attack were among the people sent to the hospitals.

 

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11:35 a.m.

 

Ohio State University says a shelter-in-place warning has been lifted and the scene is secure following reports of an active shooter and at least seven people injured.

 

Ohio State tweeted Monday morning that all classes would be canceled for the rest of the day.

 

The university had warned students in a series of tweets earlier Monday that there was an active shooter on campus and that they should run, hide or fight.

 

The Columbus Fire Department says seven people had been taken to the hospital. It says two of those people were in stable condition. It didn't have details on the other five.

 

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11:33 a.m.

 

Ohio State says shelter-in-place warning is lifted and scene is secure after active shooter report, injuries. All Ohio State Columbus classes have been canceled for today.

 

10:45 a.m.

 

The fire department says seven people have been sent to the hospital after an active shooter was reported at Ohio State University.

 

The Columbus Fire Department says two of those people are in stable condition. It had no information on the other five people.

 

Ohio State University warned students in a series of tweets Monday morning that there was an active shooter on campus and that they should run, hide or fight.

 

One tweet says: "Buckeye Alert: Active Shooter on campus. Run Hide Fight. Watts Hall. 19th and College." Watts Hall is a materials science and engineering building.

 

It is not immediately clear if the shooting is still in progress.

 

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This story has been corrected to show that the fire department said seven people have been sent to the hospital after a report of an active shooter at Ohio State University, not that they said seven people have been sent to the hospital after a shooting at Ohio State University.

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10:30 a.m.

 

Ohio State University is telling students there's an active shooter on campus and they should "Run Hide Fight."

 

Ohio State's official Twitter page retweeted a post from OSU Emergency Management saying there is an active shooter on campus in Columbus on Monday morning.

 

The tweet says: "Buckeye Alert: Active Shooter on campus. Run Hide Fight. Watts Hall. 19th and College." Watts Hall is a materials science and engineering building.

 

"Run, hide, fight" is standard protocol for active shooter situations. It means: Run, evacuate if possible; Hide, get silently out of view; or Fight, as a last resort, take action to disrupt or incapacitate the shooter if your life is in imminent danger.

 

A Columbus police dispatcher declined to comment on the reports, but police vehicles were seen at the scene.

 

 

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Wrong-way Driver Killed in Collision with Other Vehicles

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Police say a woman has died after driving the wrong way on a central Ohio street and hitting another vehicle head-on.

 

Columbus police say 60-year-old Bonita Allen, of Columbus, was killed while driving the wrong way on U.S. 23 early Monday. Police say Allen collided head-on with a sports utility vehicle, causing it to spin and hit a car in the same lane.

 

Police say two women in the SUV and a man in the car received treatment for non-life threatening injuries.

 

Allen was pronounced dead at the scene.

 

It was Columbus' 55th traffic fatality this year.

 

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Cleveland Airport Trying to Reduce Wait Times This Winter

 

CLEVELAND (AP) — Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is trying to reduce the length of time people must wait for planes on snowy days and have more planes arrive on time.

 

The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer reports Hopkins now has a team of more than 100 people operating 60 snow removal vehicles.

 

Hopkins used federal money to buy new equipment such as plows and ice removal machines. Officials say crews can now clear Hopkins' 11,000-foot runway in 20 minutes — twice as fast as before.

 

Hopkins officials have had discussions with counterparts at airports in Buffalo and Chicago that deal with lake effect snow to determine the best methods for snow removal.

 

The airport also is developing a system for removing snow from runways when fewer planes are flying.

 

 

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Feds: Barrier in Gorilla Exhibit Didn't Meet US Standards

 

CINCINNATI (AP) — A federal inspection has concluded that the Cincinnati Zoo's barrier to keep the public and gorillas separate wasn't in compliance with standards for housing primates the day a 3-year-old boy slipped into the gorilla exhibit and a gorilla named Harambe (huh-RAHM'-bay) was fatally shot.

 

The inspection report states that the zoo's dangerous-animal response team properly followed procedures after zoo visitors called 911 on May 28 to report a child in the gorilla enclosure. A team member concluded the child was in "life-threatening danger." The gorilla was killed to save the boy's life.

 

The zoo quickly made the barrier taller and used nylon mesh to close any gaps. It says there had been no earlier issues with the barriers, which were found compliant in earlier federal inspections, including in April.

 

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Protest of oil pipeline blocks traffic in downtown Ohio city

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Columbus police report an activist in a small group protesting construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline blocked traffic by handcuffing himself under a vehicle at a downtown intersection in the central Ohio city.

 

WCMH-TV reports other protesters chanted slogans like "water is life" as police and firefighters worked to remove the man from the minivan Monday. They used a saw to free him. Officers said the protester was facing various misdemeanor charges.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports a group called Appalachia Resist said in a news release that the demonstration was part of a nationwide protest of the pipeline. The $3.8 billion pipeline is to carry crude oil from North Dakota to terminals in Illinois.

 

Native Americans and environmentalists say it will threaten water supplies and harm sacred tribal land.

 

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New Graduation Rules Tied to Tests Worry Ohio School Leaders

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Public school superintendents from around Ohio are raising concerns that a large number of high schoolers are in jeopardy of not graduating as expected next school year because of new requirements tied to more demanding tests.

 

Some of those administrators and other supporters rallied Tuesday outside the Statehouse as the state school board discusses potential changes to address the issue. Several superintendents addressing the crowd urged supporters to keep the conversation going with lawmakers and board members to bring about change.

 

Superintendents from some districts estimate one-third or more of their current juniors are at risk of not graduating next year. The class of 2018 is the first one subject to the new rules, which are tied to end-of-course exams that are more demanding than the old Ohio Graduation Tests.

 

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Driver exchanges gunfire with Ohio police, dies after crash

 

DELAWARE, Ohio (AP) — One person has died after a car chase involving gunfire ended in a crash near Columbus.

Authorities say officers exchanged shots with the driver before the crash Monday night in Delaware County.

 

It's not clear yet whether the driver died from the crash or the shots fired at the car.

 

State troopers say the chase stated in Marion County after the driver refused to stop on U.S. Route 23 and drove south at high speeds.

 

Delaware County sheriff's officers then used a device to puncture the car's tires. The driver kept going but later crashed into a pole near the city of Delaware.

 

Authorities surrounded the car and found the driver dead inside.

 

The driver's name hasn't been released.

 

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Ohio Mom Charged After Young Son Drinks Vodka From Sippy Cup

 

CONNEAUT, Ohio (AP) - An Ohio woman has been charged with child endangerment after she sneaked a sippy cup of vodka into a high school football game and her toddler son drank from it and became ill.

Thirty-year-old Andrea Mucciarone pleaded not guilty to the misdemeanor charge Tuesday in Conneaut (KAW'-nee-awt) Municipal Court.

The public defender assigned to represent Mucciarone said Wednesday he had no comment.

Police say Mucciarone brought the sippy cup and her 23-month-old son to a Conneaut High School football game Oct. 28 and a relative later noticed something wrong with the boy when he couldn't stand up. Police were called to a hospital where the toddler was treated.

Conneaut's police chief says the toddler has been placed in the custody of a relative.

Conneaut is about 70 miles east of Cleveland.

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Ohio man pleads guilty to hate crime in attack on black man

 

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) - A white man in Ohio has pleaded guilty to a federal hate crime charge after saying in court that he and another man beat a stranger because he was black.

Prosecutors say Charles Butler, of Toledo, wrote about the attack on Facebook, saying it was "in the name of the white race."

The 33-year-old Butler pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court.

The FBI says Butler and another Toledo man drove past the victim in May while he was unloading his truck and then returned and attacked him while yelling racial slurs.

Authorities say the man's eye was damaged and a bone in his eye socket was fractured. Police say two off-duty state troopers happened by and pulled the attackers away.

A second man still faces a federal hate crime charge.

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Ohioan who beat wife's drug supplier with bat gets probation

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A man convicted of beating his wife's heroin supplier with a baseball bat has been sentenced to probation by an Ohio judge who noted extensive support for the defendant from a community fed up with drug problems.

 

The Columbus Dispatch reports Edwin Sobony II could have faced eight years in prison but was sentenced Wednesday to two years of probation for felonious assault.

 

Franklin County Judge Charles Schneider said he doesn't support "vigilante justice" but concluded that Sobony is unlikely to re-offend. Schneider said he received lots of letters in support of Sobony before sentencing and people offered to pay Sobony's legal bills.

 

The 38-year-old apologized in court for the December beating, which left the alleged supplier with skull fractures. Sobony says he was trying to protect his family.

 

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Dehumidifiers Recalled Due To Fire and Burn Hazards; $4.8 Million in Property Damage Reported

 

The U.S. Consumer Product and Safety Administration issued a recall Wednesday for Midea made dehumidifiers that can overheat, smoke and catch fire, posing serious fire and burn hazards. The recall involves about 3.4 million (in addition 850,000 were sold in Canada) units sold over a 10 year period. Dehumidifiers should be unplugged immediately.

 

Midea

 

This recall involves 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 65, 70, and 75-pint dehumidifiers with the following  brand names: Airworks, Alen, Arcticaire, Arctic King, Beaumark, Coolworks, ComfortAire, Comfort Star, Continental Electic, Crosley, Daewoo, Danby, Danby & Designer, Dayton, Degree, Diplomat, Edgestar, Excell, Fellini, Forest Air, Frigidaire, GE, Grunaire, Hanover, Honeywell, Homestyles, Hyundai, Ideal Air, Kenmore, Keystone, Kul, Midea, Nantucket, Ocean Breeze, Pelonis, Perfect Aire, Perfect Home, Polar Wind, Premiere, Professional Series, Royal Sovereign, Simplicity, Sunbeam, SPT, Sylvania, TGM, Touch Point, Trutemp, Uberhaus, Westpointe, Winix, and Winixl.
 
The brand name, model number, pint capacity and manufacture date are printed on the nameplate sticker on the back of the dehumidifier. To determine if your dehumidifier has been recalled, enter the model number at https://www.recallrtr.com/dehumidifier.
 
The dehumidifiers were sold at a number of retail locations including Lowes, Menards, PC Richard and other stores nationwide from January 2003 through December 2013 for between $100 and $300.
 
So far the chinese company Mides has received 38 reports of smoke and fire. About $4.8 million property damage has been reported. With no injuries have been reported.
 
Consumers should immediately turn off and unplug the dehumidifiers and contact GD Midea for either a replacement unit or a partial refund. Consumers whose dehumidifiers were manufactured before October 1, 2008 will receive a partial refund, not a replacement. The manufacturing dates can be found on back of units.
 
 
 

 

 

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Ohio court to hear appeal of killer who stabbed bartender

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Ohio Supreme Court has scheduled a January hearing for a killer sentenced to die for raping and fatally stabbing a bartender.

 

A judge in 2012 ordered Joseph Thomas to be put to death for the slaying of Annie McSween in Lake County two years earlier.

 

Prosecutors said Thomas attacked the 49-year-old McSween by her car after she asked him to leave the bar where she worked.

 

The court on Wednesday set oral arguments for Jan. 10 to hear the appeal from attorneys for the 32-year-old Thomas.

 

Thomas' execution is likely years away even if the court upholds the sentence because of federal appeals and the state's difficulty finding execution drugs.

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Body linked to man suspected of killing women is identified

 

ASHLAND, Ohio (AP) — Authorities in Ohio have identified the remains of a woman whose death has been connected to a man suspected in the killings of at least three other women.

 

 

A coroner identified the woman whose body was found in September near Mansfield as Candice Cunningham. Media reports say she had been living with Shawn Grate this past summer.

 

Grate has been charged in the deaths of two women whose bodies were found in a house thought to be vacant in Ashland. He has been jailed since September.

 

Authorities say that following his arrest, Grate confessed to killing two other women, including Cunningham. He hasn't been charged in those two deaths.

 

His attorneys haven't returned phone calls seeking comment.

 

The identity of a fourth woman linked to Grate still hasn't been determined.

 

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Conference highlights drug abuse epidemic's effects on kids

 

CINCINNATI (AP) — A Cincinnati Children's Hospital doctor who works with newborns addicted to heroin says the opiate epidemic is harming children born addicted and creating chaos for older kids who can't have normal childhoods because of their parents' drug problems.

 

Dr. Kathy Wedig says the epidemic affects society overall because of the cost of treating and helping such children.

 

Wedig spoke Tuesday at a Cincinnati conference addressing the epidemic's effects on children. The event drew hundreds of doctors, nurses, social workers and addiction specialists.

 

The Public Children Services Association of Ohio says the number of children taken into custody has risen 19 percent over the past seven years, largely due to parents' painkiller and heroin addictions. The group says placing addicts' children in protective custody is costing taxpayers $45 million annually.

 

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Medical marijuana advisory panel gets to work in Ohio

 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's new medical marijuana advisory committee is getting to work.

 

The 14-member panel is charged with coming up with recommendations on how medicinal cannabis will be grown, packaged, distributed and regulated. It was holding its first meeting Tuesday in Columbus.

 

A law that took effect Sept. 8 created the Medical Marijuana Advisory Committee. The law gave the state a year to put the program in place.

 

The panel includes appointees of Republican Gov. John Kasich (KAY'-sik) and legislative leaders of both parties. Representatives include pharmacists, physicians, a nurse, a patient advocate, a caregiver, a farmer, a county sheriff, the political director for a labor union, an employer and a college professor.

 

Appointees from the Drug Free Action Alliance, which opposed medical marijuana, represent mental-health and drug-addiction professionals.

 

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