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2017 Ag Hall of Fame Class to be Inducted at 15th Annual Banquet

The Hardin County Agriculture Hall of Fame has announced the 2017 honorees to be inducted at the fifteenth annual Agriculture Hall of Fame recognition banquet.  The 2017 inductees include: Merritt Corbin, Joe Cornely, and Jim Lyle.  The banquet will be held on Tuesday, December 5th, beginning at 6:30 pm at St. John's Evangelical Church on East Carrol Street in Kenton.  The public is invited to come to honor these inductees and their families, and to recognize their many accomplishments.  The purpose of the county Agriculture Hall of Fame is to recognize outstanding agricultural contributions by Hardin County people and to honor those who have brought distinction to themselves and the agricultural industry.   

 

Dave Russell will present the keynote address.  Russell is a local broadcast journalist who got his start as the farm director for both WRFD and WOWO Radio, worked for the Indiana Farm Bureau as Director of Information and Public Relations, was a farm broadcaster for Tribune Radio/Channel Earth, and a writer/producer for Baxter Communications.  Russell served as the Agricultural Liaison for the Indiana Department of Environmental Management, and Brownfield Ag News as an anchor/reporter covering Indiana and Ohio.  He formed Dave Russell Media, LLC in 1980 where he works today.

 

Merritt Martin Corbin graduated from Forest High School in 1937.  He went on to The Ohio State University where he earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in Agriculture in 1941, with majors in Agricultural Education, Agricultural Economics, and Agricultural Engineering.  He lived in Hardin County until 1941, when he left to serve in World War II.  Merritt Corbin was a 1st Lieutenant in the Army, serving with the 727th Amphibian Tractor Battalion from 1942-46, where he won several awards.  After World War II, he moved to Fremont for his first job with the USDA Farm Security Administration.  He became a county supervisor over two counties in 1946, making loans to farmers, particularly returning veterans and servicing loans already in place while working in Warren.  He became assistant manager and then manager of the Wooster Production Credit Association (P.C.A.) in 1954.

 

Corbin was later promoted to Assistant Vice President, P.C.A. at the central office in Ashland.  He was a credit supervisor for three field offices and responsible for the initial start of AGRIFAX, a computerized farm record keeping system before retiring with 30 years of service to P.C.A.  He still owned the family farm in Hardin County until it was sold in 1987, before he passed away in 2010.  Corbin was a member of the American Legion – Post No. 68, Farmer’s Home Administration Employees Association, and The Ohio State University Alumni Association where he received the Alumni Centennial Award.  He sang in a men’s chorus and two quartets, placing 6th in an international competition.  He was a member of the Blanchard River Church of Christ, Dunkirk; Champion Heights Presbyterian Church, Warren; Trinity United Church of Christ, Wooster; and United Methodist Church, Wooster and Winter Haven, Florida.

 

Joe Cornely graduated from Kenton High School in 1974.  After high school, he moved on to Bowling Green State University, where he graduated in 1978 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Speech and Communications Education.  He began working in agriculture shortly after graduation from college at WRFD, WLW, and then again at WRFD Radio Stations.  While at WRFD, he developed the station’s 90 minute mid-day farm program which reached farmers in 70 Ohio counties.  Cornely was chosen by U.S. Secretary of Agriculture John Block to accompany the U.S. Delegation to the European Union Economic Summit.  He was president of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters in 1995, and was voted the ‘National Farm Broadcaster of the Year’ by his peers in 1996.  

 

Cornely joined the Ohio Farm Bureau in 1998 as Director of Media Relations and is now Senior Director of Corporate Communications.  During his time at Ohio Farm Bureau, he conceived and launched the group’s member publication ‘Our Ohio,’ its revised newspaper ‘Buckeye Farm News,’ and initiated the weekly public affairs radio show ‘Town Hall Ohio.’  He led Farm Bureau into social media and has been honored by the American Farm Bureau more than a dozen times for his work.  The Ohio State University recognized him with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Service Award.  His community involvement includes being active as a little league baseball coach, serving as president of his son’s high school baseball boosters club, has been a contributor to FFA and 4-H, the Ohio Farm Bureau Foundation, NAFB Foundation, Ohio Association of Food Banks, and other local charities.  He regularly volunteers his work as master of ceremonies for the Ohio 4-H Foundation and Cultivating a Cure cancer fundraiser.

 

Jim Lyle is a graduate of Alger High School.  He has been a resident of Hardin County for 76 years where he is the fourth generation of his family to farm the family farm in the Scioto Marsh south of McGuffey.  He produces corn and soybeans and previously raised Poland China hogs.  Although farming has always been his love, he has been in the carpentry business for 60 years, building houses and doing repairs for his customers in Hardin County.  Jim and his wife Jean managed the Agrico Fertilizer plant in Alger from 1965-66.  He has been willing to try conservation practices such as installing hybrid poplar tree windbreaks to prevent erosion on his farm, working with the Hardin Soil and Water Conservation District.  He has also installed grass waterways on his farm and uses cover crops.  The Hardin Soil and Water Conservation District named him ‘District Cooperator of the Year’ twice in the 1980s.  He has participated in on-farm nitrogen rate trials through Ohio State University Extension.  

 

Lyle has been a 4-H advisor and served 20 years on the Hardin County Fair Board.  While a fair director, he has held roles as swine superintendent, grounds chairman, vice president, and president.  In 2011, he received the ‘Hardin County Fair Honoree Award’ for his service.  He has been a member of the McDonald Grange for 59 years, a 7th degree member and has held the office of Master in this organization.  He has served his country as a member of the Army Reserves for six years.  He is a past member of the Hardin County Farm Bureau Board.  In addition, Lyle was on the first steering committee for the Hardin County Agriculture Hall of Fame.  He has been a member of the Mt. Zion United Methodist Church for 66 years, served as Roundhead Township Trustee for 26 years, and was named the Alger Alumni Association Alumnus of the Year.  

 

Tickets for the Hardin County Agriculture Hall of Fame Banquet must be purchased in advance through November 27.  Tickets are $12, and available at the Hardin County Extension office (419-674-2297) or from the committee members: Dustin McCullough, Robert McBride, Ruth Oates, Kerry Oberlitner, Gary Harpster, Steve Poling, Luke Underwood, Robert Wood, and Mark Badertscher.

 

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Buchenroth Wins National Honors

Kolt Buchenroth 2017 graduate of Kenton High School and current student at The Ohio State University won big at the 90th National FFA Convention.

 

Kolt Buchenroth employee with WKTN won the National Proficiency for Agricultural Communications this past week in Indianapolis, Indiana.  Kolt who is the Agricultural News Director at WKTN and manages the Hardin County Fair’s Website and Facebook page describes his win as a honorable experience. In his interview with Thomas Shaw from National FFA Kolt says “He has a long list of people to thank for this honor.”

 

“All the people back at that the fair and of course all the people back at that station, the Ohio Ag Net. My school administration and of course my family.”

 

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Ridgemont's Jolliff Named Outstanding Ag Educator

Ridgemont Ag teacher and Hardin County Ag Hall of Fame member Stephanie Jolliff has been awarded the Region 4 Outstanding Teacher of the Year award. 
 
Mrs. Jolliff is a graduate of Ohio State and has been teaching at Ridgemont Schools for the last years. She was recently awarded the Region Four Outstanding Teacher at the 90th National FFA Convention held in Indianapolis, Indiana. In an interview with Thomas Shaw from the National FFA, Stephanie tells that being raised on a rural farm and influence from family lead her to be a Ag teacher.
 
“I grew up on a rural farm in Morrow county and had a family member who was an Ag teacher who supported my interest. I saw that kids in Ag knew what they wanted to do in life and had a direction. I looked at the opportunity to make a difference in people's lives. And I wanted to make the community a better place.” Jolliff said.

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County Master Gardeners Take Home State Awards

Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Coordinator Dave McPheron accepts the state award for the Outstanding MGV Invasive Species Project-medium division at the State Master Gardener Volunteer Conference.
 

The Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers brought back two state awards from the Ohio MGV Conference held last month at The Ohio State University in Columbus.


‘Invasive Species Media Series’ was recognized as state winner for the Invasive Species Outstanding MGV Project award category for medium sized groups at this annual conference.


Also, the Hardin County group was recognized as a platinum ‘Standards of Excellence’ award winner. This is the highest degree of accomplishment for a county Master Gardener Volunteer program, based on guidelines set up by the Ohio State University Extension.

 

 

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Hardin County Beef Producers Seeking Public Input

The Hardin County Cattle Producers is seeking the public's input. The group said that they would like to increase the number of beef projects at the Hardin County Fair, and question how they can get more junior fair members involved. 

 

The survey is available here.

 

(Photo courtesy of the Hardin County Agriculturual Society)

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Fair Champs Judged

The Hardin County Carcass Show of Champions was held Thursday, September 14 at Mt. Victory Meats.  A group of adults and young people were on hand to hear judge and OSU Graduate Research Assistant of Meat Science Tori Trbovich discuss the merits of the winning animal carcasses from the 2017 Hardin County Fair.  

 

The Grand Champion and Reserve Champion steers, barrows, gilts, lambs, and goats from the Hardin County Fair are sent to Mt. Victory Meats for holding and processing.  As in all county fairs, the winning animals are carefully tested by the Ohio Department of Agriculture for any illegal residues.  These winning animals were again found to be drug free and of high quality.  

The project animals are evaluated in the show ring by experienced judges, who try to estimate which one will yield the highest quality of lean meat.  For the carcass show, actual measurements are taken of the weight, muscle, and fat to determine the quality and amount of meat that can be harvested from these market animals.  

The steers were evaluated for percent boneless trim retail cuts, as well as USDA quality grades.  The grand champion steer had a 14.4 square inch ribeye area, with 0.5 inches of back fat.  The grand champion graded a high choice quality grade.  This first place steer had yield grade of 3.4 (on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 has the highest cutability).  The reserve champion steer had a 16.4 square inch ribeye area, 0.4 inches of back fat, and a yield grade of 2.1.  This second place steer also received a low choice quality grade.  Overall on the rail, the reserve champion steer’s carcass ranked higher than the grand champion steer’s carcass.

The hog carcasses are evaluated based on the amount of lean muscle they will yield in combination with the amount of back fat.  On the four hog carcasses in the show, the loin muscle areas ranged from 6.7 to 9.5 square inches, with the grand champion barrow having the largest loin muscle area.  The grand champion gilt scored the highest percent lean muscle with 4.01 percentage points higher than the reserve champion barrow.  The grand and reserve champion gilts both had a lower amount of back fat than any of the other hogs.  Overall, the grand champion gilt’s carcass ranked higher than the reserve champion gilt.  The champion barrow’s carcass ranked higher than the reserve champion barrow’s carcass.

The reserve champion lamb carcass had 43.54% boneless trim retail cuts while the grand champion lamb carcass had 40.10% boneless trim retail cuts.  The reserve champion lamb had 0.2 inches of back fat, while the grand champion had 0.3 inches of back fat.  Overall, the reserve champion lamb was ranked above the champion lamb when evaluated by the carcass show judge.

When comparing the goat carcasses, the grand champion goat’s carcass was 5 pounds lighter with 41.81% boneless trim retail cuts and had a ribeye area of 2.4 square inches.  The reserve champion goat’s carcass dressed out with 39.91% boneless retail cuts with a ribeye area of 1.9 square inches.  Back fat was 0.1 inches on both the grand champion and the reserve champion goats.  In the end, the grand champion goat’s carcass ranked higher than the reserve champion goat’s carcass when all factors were considered.

The carcass show animals illustrate the high quality of meat animals being produced by Hardin County 4-H and FFA members.  These young people and their parents need to be commended on the outstanding job they are doing with the feeding and care of their project animals.  The complete carcass show data is available at the OSU Extension office and on Hardin County Extension’s website at hardin.osu.edu.

The Hardin County Carcass Show of Champions is organized by OSU Extension, and is sponsored by the Hardin County Sheep Improvement Association, the Hardin County Pork Producers, the Hardin County Cattle Producers, the Hardin County Fairboard, and Craig and Ed Powell at Mt. Victory Meats.

 

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August Rainfall Report Released

During the month of August, Extension volunteer rainfall reporters received an average of 1.39 inches of rain.  The most rain for this month, 3.40 inches, fell in Jackson Township as measured by Rick Weber.  The least rain reported during the month, 0.65 inches was reported in Marion Township by Mark Lowery.  During the same month last year, an average of 5.22 inches of rain fell.  The rainfall recorded in August over the past ten years averaged 4.03 inches.  

For the growing season since April 15, the average precipitation in the townships was 25.14 inches, ranging from 30.99 inches in Jackson Township to 21.55 inches in Dudley Township. The growing season average rainfall was 6.36 inches above the ten-year average for Hardin County through August.

After a wet, cool spring and early summer, rainfall in August was very low.  Moisture in the soil helped to keep crops growing until drying out.  Areas of low rainfall occurred after pollination in cornfields, but during kernel fill.  This may result in smaller kernels on the ears, lowering yields.  Soybean plants in some areas did not grow as high, resulting in fewer nodes where soybean pods attach.  Smaller seed size could also be expected with the dryer weather during the month.  Corn silage harvest has been taking place in the county with farmers chopping corn for dairy cattle.  

Soybeans are maturing and leaves are dropping, signaling start of the bean harvest soon around the county.  Corn is also maturing, while some corn has yet to reach black layer maturity.  Later planted corn will need a later frost to reach full maturity.  Forecasts call for a frost a week later this year, which will benefit corn producers who either planted or replanted corn at later dates.  Hay harvest is mostly done in the county, as later cuttings require longer drying due to cooler weather and hay plants need time to build up reserves to successfully overwinter.

 

Editor: See attached table for your use

Hardin County Extension Rainfall Report for August 2017 (recorded in inches)

Township

Reporter

August 2017

Growing Season (from Apr. 15-2017)

Blanchard Township

Crop Production Services

2.20

29.98

Buck Township

Heritage Coop./Kenton

1.03

24.01

Cessna Township

Steve Lowery

0.75

24.25

Dudley Township

Dale Rapp

1.73

21.55

Goshen Township

Brien Bros. Farm

1.13

24.05

Hale Township

Travis Ramsey

1.65

23.41

Jackson Township

Rick Weber

3.40

30.99

Liberty Township

Phil Epley

1.39

25.00

Lynn Township

Jan Layman

1.40

25.33

Marion Township

Mark Lowery

0.65

24.41

McDonald Township

Jerry Stout

1.26

23.45

Pleasant Township

Robert McBride

1.16

25.00

Roundhead Township

Mike Lautenschlager

0.80

26.20

Taylor Creek Township

Silver Creek Supply

0.90

24.29

Washington Township

Randy Preston

1.35

25.19

 

Average


1.39

25.14

 

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Hardin Northern Hosts Soil Judgers

The annual Hardin Northern Soil Judging Invitational was held last week.

 

According to Hardin Northern FFA Reporter Cassidy Crooks, Around 450 students from 20 schools participated in the event. Students judged soil for it’s uses, slope, texture, and other features. The Hardin Northern Rural Soil Judging team placed 16 out of 15 teams. The team high was Lance Good.

 

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Recorders Report 11.5 Inches as a High in July

During the month of July, Extension rainfall reporters recorded an average of 8.23 inches of rain in Hardin County.  Last year, the average rainfall for July was 1.68 inches.  The wet spring experienced by the county up until July was continued with an even more wet July, with several rainfall events adding to already wet soils.  This year’s July was exactly the opposite of last year, when the county received very little rain for the month.


Crop Production Services in Blanchard Township received 11.50 inches of rain for the month, the most of any of the township sites.  The least rain in July, 6.10 inches, was collected in McDonald Township by Jerry Stout.  For the growing season from April 15 through July, the average precipitation in the townships was 23.75 inches, with a wide range from 19.82 to 27.78 inches.  


July followed the pattern of a cool and wet spring, with rainfall continuing in high amounts combined with mild temperatures.  Soils continued to be bombarded with rain events, not allowing much time for moisture levels to dry out.  As a result, ponding continued in some fields, were drainage and compaction are issues.  This also delayed field operations such as applying pesticides and manure applications.


Corn made much progress in growth during the month, with the extra rain and on occasion, warmer days.  Later planted corn started to grow at good rates, except in areas where the corn was stunted and yellow from too much moisture.  Because so much corn was replanted in the county this year, pollination occurred at different times in some fields.  This could have an effect on kernel fill and ultimately cause lower yields.  Extra moisture and cool conditions did bring common rust infections in most area cornfields, so choosing a hybrid with a good disease package helped with this issue.

 

Soybeans have now entered the reproductive stages as well, as the crop is well into pod fill in several fields.  Growth and development will continue with the soybean plants as this crop is able to adapt to weather conditions easier than the corn plant during this stage of growth.  Soybean plants are shorter this year, but will hopefully adjust and yield well.  There was very little disease pressure in soybeans so far this season, with the exception of a small amount of brown spot earlier, which should not affect yields.  Farmers will need to scout their fields and keep an eye on late season diseases and pests to ensure a good crop as the growing season progresses.

 

Hardin County Extension Rainfall Report for July 2017 (recorded in inches)

Township

Reporter

July 2017

Growing Season (from Apr. 15-2017)

Blanchard Township

Crop Production Services

11.50

27.78

Buck Township

Heritage Coop./Kenton

9.01

22.98

Cessna Township

Steve Lowery

8.05

23.50

Dudley Township

Dale Rapp

6.50

19.82

Goshen Township

Brien Bros. Farm

9.03

22.92

Hale Township

Travis Ramsey

7.45

21.76

Jackson Township

Rick Weber

8.70

27.59

Liberty Township

Phil Epley

9.62

23.61

Lynn Township

Jan Layman

6.70

23.93

Marion Township

Mark Lowery

9.94

23.76

McDonald Township

Jerry Stout

6.10

22.19

Pleasant Township

Robert McBride

7.68

23.84

Roundhead Township

Mike Lautenschlager

7.75

25.40

Taylor Creek Township

Silver Creek Supply

6.92

23.39

Washington Township

Randy Preston

8.51

23.84

 

Average

8.23

23.75

 

 

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Crops May Finish Better Than Expected Despite Season's Wet Start

The Ohio Ag Net annual Ohio Crop Tour is underway this week. The tour takes a trip down I-75 and I-71 with a team of farmers to sample crops from across the state. The I-75 leg is where you’ll find Hardin County Farmer, Paul Ralston. The West leg of the tour is covering 22 counties. The two groups converge in Clinton County to compare notes.

 

Ralston, who is a licensed drone pilot, uses his unmanned aerial vehicle to fly over fields on the tour.

 

“We’re only walking into edges of fields and trying to get a representative sample. You put that drone up and you really see what’s going on in these fields.” Said Ralston.

 

Ralston notes that our region has had a challenging growing season. He says the tour is finding disease in both corn and beans due to the wet weather early on in the season. The group is also seeing Nitrogen deficiency in fields.

 

Ralston said he expected variability as the group moved to Hancock County, but says the county also saw much of the similar rains that may not have damaged the crops as much, but now drought-like conditions can be observed from the northern portion of the state.

 

Ralston says the crops maybe doing better than expected.

 

“I think there's more crops than what most people think. I would’be guessed Ohio to come in the 160 range. We were just in Defiance County and it was just over 200 [bushels per acre].”

 

In Allen County, Ralston notes that the group observed Japanese beetles that had infested corn and bean crops, but Ralston notes that the insect pressure is nothing of major concern.

 

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Soil Health and Compaction Event Slated

Crop production success can be highly related to soil health and compaction.  Soil health is a topic of growing concern, which addresses many aspects of modern agricultural systems, from productivity and yield to water quality and build-up of carbon in the soils which improve soil, air, and water quality.  Management practices such as tillage, land-forming, clearing, or drainage influence these factors and processes.  Soil health is the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living ecosystem that sustains plants, animals, and humans increasing production, profit, and protection of natural resources.  Maintaining and building healthy soils is the foundation for developing sustainable farming systems to supply food and fiber to the world.

 

Soil compaction is becoming a more serious problem for farmers.  Field machines tend to be heavier, and there is motivation for farmers to work the soil when it is too moist.  Because compacted soil has smaller pores and fewer natural channels, water infiltration is drastically reduced.  This causes greater surface wetness, and more runoff, which in turn increases erosion, and longer drying time.  Wet fields delay planting and harvesting along with decreased crop yields.  Plant roots don't grow well in dense soil.  Inadequate moisture and nutrients reach the plant, and yield is reduced.

 

Dr. Steven Culman, Soil Fertility specialist at The Ohio State University will be the guest speaker at an event being held Tuesday, August 1 at Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative Community Room located at 1210 West Lima Street in Kenton.  The program will begin at 6:30 pm with a catered meal, followed by a presentation by Culman.  Dr. Culman is involved with new research which addresses issues with soil degradation in pipeline installations and approaches you can take to remediate compacted soils.  Numerous natural gas pipelines have been approved across Ohio and neighboring states with installation to continue over the next several years.  These installations will collectively result in a large amount of soil disturbance in the state, but the effect of this disturbance on crop productivity, if any, is largely unknown.  

 

The Ohio State University is conducting a study to better understand and manage the impacts of pipeline installations across the state with the following objectives: document the effects of pipeline installation on soil properties and crop productivity; and determine how long these effects persist.  The research approach will evaluate crop yields and soil properties over the installed pipeline and in an unaffected adjacent area, using yield maps, aerial imagery, and soil analyses.  The study will focus primarily on grain crops, but will also work with a limited number of hay fields.  After completion of this research, better recommendations will be available to help farmers manage similar issues dealing with soil disturbance and compaction problems.

 

This event is co-sponsored by the Hardin County Farm Bureau and OSU Extension.  Cost for the meal and program, followed by a Farm Bureau annual meeting will be $10 for Farm Bureau members and $15 for non-members.  Anyone interested in learning more about soil health and compaction issues is encouraged to attend.  Please RSVP by calling 419-447-3091 by July 25 so that an accurate meal count can be assured.  For more information about soil health and compaction issues, contact Mark Badertscher, OSU Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator at the Hardin County Extension office.

 

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Horseflies Moving Into The Region

The past few days horseflies have been a common problem around the region.  They feed on the blood of cattle, horses, mules, hogs, dogs, deer, other warm-blooded animals, and even humans. These flies cut through the skin with their knife-like mouthparts and suck the blood for several minutes. When they fly away, a drop or two of blood usually exudes from the wound, permitting secondary feeding sites for other nuisance insects. So, where do these pesky flies come from, and what can you do to control them?  Joe Boggs, OSU Extension Educator, Commercial Horticulture in Hamilton County wrote the following article which appeared in the July 31 issue of the OSU Extension Buckeye Yard and Garden onLine.

 

There are several species of horse flies in Ohio ranging in size from 3/8 - 1 1/8" in length.  All are aggressive and vicious biters, but the bigger ones are particularly menacing. Female horse flies require blood meals to be able to produce eggs.  When she finds a host, the female uses her sharp, knife-like mouthparts to slash upon a wound in the skin; the mandibles of large horse flies are powerful enough to cut through tanned leather!  After opening a wound, the female injects saliva that has anticoagulation properties and she then laps up the free flowing blood.  The bite is extremely painful, and blood continues to flow from the wound even after the female finishes feeding.

 

Horse flies have specialized vision that allows them to see heat; they literally use thermal imaging to locate their hosts.  The flies are also able to track large moving objects, particularly dark colored objects, even while the flies are in fast flight.  Taken together, their visual acuity allows them to effectively zero in on large, savory, warm blooded animals like cows, deer, people, and of course, horses.  Unfortunately for the flies, their visual perception may also cause them to be fooled.  A dark colored moving car that has been warmed by the summer sun looks to a horse fly like a dark, galloping horse!  Horse flies swarming around moving cars can lead to catastrophic consequences ... for the flies ... with the last thing passing through the fly's minds being their rear ends.

 

There are a number of things you can do to keep yourself off the horse fly menu.  If possible, avoid horse fly habitat.  Their larvae feed on decaying organic matter in moist soil, so horse flies are frequently found in swamps or near streams and ponds.  If you can't avoid their habitat, schedule your activities to avoid the flies.  Horse flies are active during the day; they can't find their hosts at night.  So, evening pool parties will be free of horse flies.  If you must venture into horse fly habitat during the day, remain alert and take precautions.  Most flies are silent flyers while horse flies produce a loud, buzzing sound.  When you hear the buzz, locate the fly because horse flies love to land stealthily for a quick bite.  However, avoid running; remember that horse flies are attracted to moving objects!  Wear light clothing; dark clothing is like wearing an "eat here" sign.  Finally, while insect repellents that contain DEET or picaridin may provide some protection, horse flies are very good at finding unprotected skin.  Long sleeves, long pants, and neckerchiefs can help to thwart the flies.

 

For more information about OSU Extension, Hardin County, visit the Hardin County OSU Extension web site at www.hardin.osu.edu, the Hardin County OSU Extension Facebook page or contact Mark Badertscher, at 419-674-2297.

 

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Clinton County Fair Hogs Test Positive for Swine Flu, ODA Releases Statement

Two hogs tested positive for Swine Flu at a county fair in Clinton County over the weekend. The Ohio Department of Agriculture releasing a joint statement with the Ohio Department of Health saying

 

Ohio’s fair season is underway across the state and leaders at the Ohio Departments of Agriculture (ODA) and Health (ODH) are reminding Ohioans to practice good hygiene when visiting livestock exhibits this summer.

 

“Ohio’s fairs are great places to enjoy some summer fun, but visitors should remember some illnesses can be directly transmitted between animals and humans,” said ODH Director Lance Himes. “Simple steps like good hand-washing can help stop the spread of any illness and make sure your fair visit is a safe one.”

 

Visitors should always wash their hands with soap and water before and after petting or touching any animal. Never eat, drink or put anything in your mouth in animal areas. Parents and caregivers are encouraged to leave strollers outside the animal exhibits and carry small children. Older adults, pregnant women, young children and people with weakened immune systems should consider avoiding animal areas.

 

“Fairs are the highlight of the summer in many communities for many families across Ohio and we want to ensure they stay that way,” said ODA Director David T. Daniels. “Maintaining healthy people and animals is our top priority, and we encourage all fair guests to follow posted signs and make smart decisions when visiting the fair.

 

ODA is actively working with fair boards to increase access to hand sanitizers and hand-washing stations. Frequent hand-washing can lower your risk of getting sick from influenza, salmonella, e. Coli and other illnesses. In addition, ODA has provided information and encouraged fair organizers to post reminders about good hygiene in animal areas to help protect the health of fairgoers. Ohio’s fair veterinarians are trained and encouraged to closely monitor fair livestock and poultry for clinical signs of illness.

 

Exhibitors who believe their animal may be sick should immediately contact their barn manager and fair veterinarian. Fair guests who experience illness should contact a medical professional, and their local health district.

 

Hardin County Fair Board President Howard Lyle said that a teleconference was being held Monday on the topic.

 

We will continue to bring you the latest as to what this means for the approaching Hardin County Fair.

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Mens Garden Club Sponsors "Evening Garden Affair"

The Hardin County Men’s Garden Club with the assistance of the Hardin County Master Gardeners are sponsoring  “An Evening Garden Affair” on Monday evening July 24 at the Friendship Gardens of Hardin County located at 960 Kohler Street in Kenton.  The event is from 6 to 9 pm and will feature Joe Puperi of Advanced Tree Health with a program about selecting, planting, and managing soil for healthy trees in the landscape.

Joe Puperi is the founder and owner of Advanced Tree Health of Findlay.  He graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Forestry from Virginia Tech in 1998.  Puperi has been practicing forestry and arboriculture since then.  Seeing more demand for high quality tree care than was being met in the area, in 2006 he started Advanced Tree Health to help fill that gap.  His love for trees and the outdoors has led him to a career field that he enjoys.  A desire to serve people dictates quality work being offered to each client.  Puperi is an International Society Arboriculture (ISA) Board Certified Master Arborist (a more rigorous recognition than the ISA Certified Arborist) and a Society of American Foresters Certified Forester.  

 

This event is free and open to the public, rain or shine with the program inside the Harco workshop with seating and air conditioning.  It will then move outside for a demonstration and questions.  Master Gardener Volunteers will be stationed throughout the Friendship Gardens for the evening to answer your gardening questions.  Door prizes and refreshments will be part of the evening festivities.  If you have not visited the Friendship Gardens, this will provide you with an ideal time for your first visit and to come away with good gardening information and advice.

 

The evening begins at 6 pm with casual browsing in the garden and refreshments.  Joe Puperi will speak at 7 pm and the evening will continue after his presentation with a further chance to explore the Friendship Gardens.  All who have an interest in gardening will not want to miss this event.  Parking is at the garden off Kohler Street or in front of Harco Industries.  For further information contact the OSU Extension office at 419-674-2297.

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Extension Rainfall Report Released for June

In the month of June, Extension rainfall reporters recorded an average of 5.15 inches of rain in Hardin County.  Last year, the average rainfall for June was 5.81 inches.  Rainfall for June 2017 was 0.16 inches less than the ten-year average rainfall in the month of June.  

Roundhead Township received 6.95 inches for the month, the most of any of the township sites.  The least rain in June, 2.76 inches was collected in Liberty Township.  For the growing season since April 15, the average precipitation in all the townships was 15.52 inches, with a wide range from 13.32 inches in Dudley Township to 18.89 inches in Jackson Township.  

Rain persisted most of the month of June, with precipitation occurring 2/3 of the days.  Some fields continued to pond and flood in low areas, areas with compaction, and other hard to drain soils.  This constant rain kept farmers busy replanting crops, and delayed nitrogen applications in corn and herbicide applications in soybeans.  Wet weather and later herbicide applications allowed for giant ragweed and marestail weeds to thrive.

Wheat harvest is mostly complete with good yields and good quality grain.  Folllowing wheat harvest, some farmers planted double crop soybeans.  Straw and second cutting of hay has been baled in some area fields as weather permits.  Oats are starting to mature and rye planted for seed will soon be harvested if not already cut.  Corn producers are hoping for a late frost as replanted corn has this crop growing in various stages in the same fields.  Later planted corn could result in higher moisture rates during harvest, a problem that has not been prominent in the past two years.  Earlier planted soybeans are have entered reproductive stages, producing flowers.  Earlier corn will also soon enter reproductive stages, producing tassels and ears with silks.

Hardin County Extension Rainfall Report for June 2017 (recorded in inches)

Township

Reporter

June 2017

Growing Season (from Apr. 15-2017)

Blanchard Township

Crop Production Services

3.88

16.28

Buck Township

Heritage Cooperative/Kenton

4.30

13.97

Cessna Township

Steve Lowery

5.07

15.45

Dudley Township

Dale Rapp

5.05

13.32

Goshen Township

Brein Bros. Farm

4.76

13.89

Hale Township

Travis Ramsey

6.26

14.31

Jackson Township

Rick Weber

6.10

18.89

Liberty Township

Phil Epley

2.76

13.99

Lynn Township

Jan Layman

5.80

17.23

Marion Township

Mark Lowery

4.46

13.82

McDonald Township

Jerry Stout     

6.32

16.09

Pleasant Township

Robert McBride

5.61

16.16

Roundhead Township

Mike Lautenschlager

6.95

17.65

Taylor Creek Township

Silver Creek Supply

5.42

16.47

Washington Township

Randy Preston

4.51

15.33

 

Average

5.15

15.52

 

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County Master Gardners Host Statewide Training

Hardin County Master Gardener Volunteers Darla Crownhart and Judy Magee identify disease, insect, and other problems on specimens as part of the statewide Plant Diagnostic Clinic held in Kenton.

 

32 Master Gardener Volunteers from 8 counties came to Kenton on Friday, June 23 for a statewide Plant Diagnostic Clinic.  This training was conducted by OSU Extension and hosted by the Hardin County Master Gardener Volunteers.  OSU Extension horticulture and entomology specialists Pam Bennett, Nancy Taylor, and Curtis Young provided instruction in the morning about disease, insect, and environmental factors with conifers such as spruce, pine, and fir trees.  After lunch, the attendees split up into small groups and examined over 30 specimens with hand lenses and other information provided to them in the morning session.

 

Upon completion of the specimen examinations, the horticulture experts then used a projection system to show close-up images of each plant problem while discussing symptoms and management steps.  Knowledge gained from this clinic will help the Master Gardener Volunteers diagnose plant problems that the public brings to the county OSU Extension offices.  It will also serve as continuing education for building upon their knowledge for providing horticulture education programs in their counties.  To request Master Gardener assistance in Hardin County, a resident can email Kim Thomas, president at kethomas1953@windstream.net or Dave McPheron, volunteer coordinator at plantman12@windstream.net in addition to contacting the OSU Extension office at 419-674-2297 for assistance with a lawn and garden issue.  Residents may also post photos with questions on the Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardeners Facebook page.
 

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Wheat Harvest Tips

The wheat crop is drying down very fast and harvest is starting in some parts of the state.  As harvest continues over the next few weeks, growers should keep their eyes on the weather and the moisture content of the grain to ensure good quality wheat.  Wheat grain is about 30 percent moisture when it reaches physiological maturity and can be harvested efficiently and easily when the grain moisture is between 14 and 20 percent.  Harvesting above 20 percent grain moisture increases kernel damage, and reduces storability, test weight, and germination percentage.

 

Delaying harvest past the time that grain reaches 14 percent moisture reduces yield about one-fourth bushel per acre per day, increases cutterbar loss, and decreases test weight each time the grain is wetted by rain or very heavy dew.  Exposure of the grain to rain after maturity may lead to sprouting and mold development.  Also, the risk of loss by bird and rodent feeding increases as does the potential loss due to fire, hail, high wind, and other weather factors.  Yield, test weight, germination percent, grain quality, and harvest efficiency are greatest when the grain moisture is between 14 and 20 percent moisture at harvest.  Within that range wheat grain moisture decreases about one percentage point per day with normal weather conditions.

 

Wheat harvest date impacts both grain yield and quality.  Delaying wheat harvest puts the crop at risk for increased disease, lodging, sprouting, and harvest loss.  Last year in Clark County, OSU evaluated wheat harvested on June 29 (at 12% moisture content) and July 8 (at 14% moisture content).  Grain moisture increased between June 29 and July 8 due to 0.58” rain between the two dates.

 

When wheat harvest was delayed until July 8, yield decreased by 9 bu/acre, test weight decreased by 2.9 pound per bushel, and vomitoxin level increased by 0.86 parts per million.  Using a grain price of $4.50 per bushel and discounts from a local elevator, the difference the delayed wheat harvest resulted in a loss of $87 per acre compared to the June 29 harvest.  With funding from the Ohio Small Grains Marketing Program, the University is continuing this research.  However, this new work will be comparing grain yield and quality of wheat harvested at ~20% moisture to ~13% moisture.

Plan to complete harvest before the grain moisture drops below 14 percent and before it starts raining. Assuming that ideal harvest conditions last for six days enables one to estimate the moisture level at which harvest must start.  If the crop can be harvested in two days, harvest can be delayed until the grain reaches 16 percent moisture.  For a crop that will require six or more days to harvest, threshing should start when the grain reaches 20 percent moisture.

 

Check combine thoroughly for worn or broken parts that should be replaced and then lubricate according to the operators’ manual.  Adjust cylinder speed, concave clearance, fan speed, and screens for wheat.  Service the motor and remove any combustible material from the motor compartment to make the machine field ready so harvest can start on time and at the proper grain moisture content.

 

The height of the wheat plant varies across most fields and the grain table will need to be very low because some of the plants are very short.  The secondary tillers are always shorter than the main tiller, so it is prudent to check their height and be sure they are collected in to the grain table.


 

Article written by Laura Lindsey, Pierce Paul, Jim Beuerlein, and Dennis Mills - OSU Extension Small Grains Specialists, and revised by Mark Badertscher, OSU Extension Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator-Hardin County.

 

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Kentucky Bluegrass Turf Tips

Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis) is one of the most popular cool-season grasses with excellent color, texture, and density.  The biggest advantage of this grass is its underground stems, referred to as rhizomes.  They are aggressive and spread quickly, repairing damaged areas in your lawn without reseeding.  The grass will return after a fire, even though it looks dead on the surface but underground buds are still alive and the grass will grow again.  The plant can stand months of drought and will go dormant.  It will come back, however that requires some supplemental watering.  If that water is not available, you might choose another grass species.  

 

Kentucky Bluegrass cannot tolerate deep shade or wet soils, and is slow to germinate, taking a period of 2-5 weeks.  Newer cultivars are available that can crowd out weeds and show increased resistance to disease.  Bluegrass is used for home lawns, parks, schoolyards, golf courses, cemeteries, and athletic fields.  The common pests of this type of grass include leaf spot, dollar spot, grubs, rust, sod webworms, chinch bugs, and bluegrass billbugs.  There are more than 100 cultivars of bluegrass so consult your Extension office or a local nursery for the best one for your growing conditions and area.

 

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Average County Rainfall at 7.21 Inches for May

For the time period of May 1-May 31, 2017 Extension rainfall reporters recorded an average of 7.21 inches of rain in Hardin County.  Last year, the average rainfall for the same time period was 3.27 inches.  Rainfall for May was 3.45 inches more than the ten year average rainfall during the same dates.

Jackson Township received 8.90 inches of rain for May, the most of the township sites.  For the growing season since April 15, the average precipitation in the townships was 10.37 inches, with a wide range from 8.05 inches in Hale Township reported by Travis Ramsey, to 12.79 inches in Jackson Township reported by Rick Weber.  

Rainfall persisted most of the month of May, with the exception of about a week without rain in the middle of the month.  Cooler temperatures prevailed most of the month as early planted corn was slow to emerge.  Several fields had ponding events and were saturated for long periods of time, causing a need for replanting.  Both corn and soybeans were replanted multiple times in some fields, causing stands that are either thin or growing in different stages.  Later planted crops were showing more uniform emergence, although some are weeks behind the earliest planted fields.

Herbicide programs needed to be adapted in several fields to meet the advanced stage of weed development as a result of the earlier extended time period of wet conditions that favored weed growth.  Currently, soybean planting is reaching completion as farmers are hoping for warm growing degree days with timely rains to promote crop development.  Most forage growers have completed or are in the process of making the first cutting of hay, which is later than normal.  This has caused hay tonnage to increase, but lowered the feed quality.  Wheat has been less susceptible to disease as a result of the cool conditions at flowering.  Adequate moisture has benefited grain fill, but now drier conditions will be needed to keep good grain quality as harvest approaches.

 

Hardin County Extension Rainfall Report for May 1-May 31, 2017 (recorded in inches)

Township

Reporter

May 2017

Growing Season (from Apr. 15-2017)

Blanchard Township

Crop Production Services

7.90

12.40

Buck Township

Heritage Coop./Kenton

6.36

9.67

Cessna Township

Steve Lowery

7.33

10.38

Dudley Township

Dale Rapp

5.72

8.27

Goshen Township

Brien Bros. Farm

5.94

9.13

Hale Township

Travis Ramsey

5.60

8.05

Jackson Township

Rick Weber

8.90

12.79

Liberty Township

Phil Epley

8.09

11.23

Lynn Township

Jan Layman

7.30

11.43

Marion Township

Mark Lowery

7.04

9.36

McDonald Township

Jerry Stout

7.12

9.77

Pleasant Township

Robert McBride

7.26

10.55

Roundhead Township

Mike Lautenschlager

8.15

10.70

Taylor Creek Township

Silver Creek Supply

7.40

11.05

Washington Township

Randy Preston

8.06

10.82

 

Average

7.21

10.37

 

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ODA To Begin Treating For Gypsy Moths

The Ohio Department of Agriculture will begin aerial treatments designed to disrupt gypsy moth mating on 8,380 acres in Allen, Hancock, Hardin, Marion, Paulding, Union and Wyandot counties.

 

To help protect Ohio’s diverse habitat, the Ohio Department of Agriculture operates multiple programs aimed at managing the gypsy moth in Ohio. One such program, the Slow-the-Spread program, focuses on monitoring, detecting, and reducing isolated populations to slow the gypsy moth’s movement across the state through treatments.

           

Airplanes will fly 100-200 feet above the treetops and buildings to apply the treatment throughout the day. Weather permitting, treatments will begin the week of June 19th and occur over one or two days.    

 

In all counties receiving treatment, the department will use a single application of the product SPLAT GM-O. This product does not kill the moth, but it disrupts the mating process by confusing the male as it searches for a female mate. SPLAT GM-O is an organic product and is not harmful to birds, plants, pets or humans.

 

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Logan County Farm Bureau Receives OFBF Funds for Conservation

For the third year in a row, the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation is funding county Farm Bureau-led projects that help improve water quality in local communities.

 

This round of funding will put total investment by Ohio Farm Bureau and partner organizations at more than $1 million in county water quality projects.

 

In our region, the Logan County Farm Bureau received funding for water testing from subsurface tile and from surface waterways. Also planned is a presentation by two national experts on soil health and cover crops.

 

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Dairy Beef Feeder Queen Applicants Sought

The Dairy Beef Feeder queen contest is open to all girls 14 years and older (as of January 1), that are currently enrolled in 4-H or FFA with a dairy beef (feeder or steer) project.  To be eligible to compete for this honor, a member must fill out the application, complete the essay and participate in an interview.  Applicants will also be given a test over breeds, body parts, and general questions that pertain to the project.

The winner will represent the dairy beef feeder youth and also be recognized at the crowning of the Hardin County Fair King and Queen Ceremony in front of the grandstand on Tuesday night at the fair.  It is also the Dairy Beef Feeder Queen’s responsibility to attend the Dairy Beef Feeder show and assist with passing out awards on Thursday morning at the fair and be at the sale on Saturday at the fair to appear in pictures with the Grand and Reserve Champion winners.  The Dairy Beef Feeder Queen also has the option to participate in summer parades. 

A link to the application is available online at hardin.osu.edu.  If members have questions, they should contact Jolene Buchenroth at 419-673-9805. The Dairy Beef Feeder Queen application and essay deadline is June 21, 2017 and must be postmarked by this date.  Once the applications are in, applicants will be notified of the interview date.  The test will be given at the same time as the interview.  If a member needs a printed application, they should contact Jolene Buchenroth, 11740 Township Road 180, Kenton, Ohio 43326 or call the phone number above.

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Is the Hay Making Window Closed?

Hats off to those who got their first cutting made during the nice weather earlier, but some of us missed it!  There has been rain in the forecast about every three days and very wet soils from the heavy rains this past weekend across much of Ohio.  While we are eager to get that first cutting made, haste will make waste if we drive on hay stands before the soils are firm enough to support the equipment.

When we run hay equipment on soft soils, the wheel compaction damage to plant crowns will be like a plague for the remaining life of the stand.  It will lead to lower forage yield, weed invasion, and frustrating attempts to “fill-in” the damaged stand, and ultimately a premature termination of the stand.

The crop is indeed maturing and losing quality.  Our grasses are heading out and leaf diseases will begin to take their toll.  Livestock need to be fed.  While we do need to cut as soon as we can, getting on the soils before they are firm enough will only lead to bigger problems in the long run.  This is particularly true for legumes.

Now that the soils are starting to firm up, start harvesting grass stands first where possible.  Not only will they be hurt less than legumes when soils are softer, their quality is dropping quickly.  But be reasonable about this, because grasses will also be damaged permanently if the soil is too soft.

Keep in mind that while the waiting for better weather is frustrating now, wheel traffic damage turns into an ongoing frustration that is never overcome by the damaged stand.  The additional loss in forage quality while waiting for soils to dry is the lesser of two evils.

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Upper Scioto Valley FFA Chapter Holds Ag Day

​​This past Tuesday, May 9th, the USV FFA held their annual Ag Day.

 

The chapter hold this event to teach kids what FFA is all about. Also, an educator from the Ohio State University Extension Office was there to teach kids about healthy eating.

 

There were also other activities for people to enjoy such as, butter making, cow milking, edible soil and grass planting.

 

They were also taught ATV and tractor safety along with proper animal care.

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April Rainfall Report Released From OSU Extension

According to a release from OSU Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Educator, Mark Badertscher, For the time period of April 15-30, Extension rainfall reporters recorded an average of 3.16 inches of rain in Hardin County.  Last year, the average rainfall for the same time period was 1.46 inches.  Rainfall for the April 15-30 time period is 1.12 inches more than the ten year average rainfall during the same dates.

 

Blanchard Township received 4.50 inches for the time period, the most of any of the township sites.  Marion Township received 2.32 inches the least of any of the township.  There was a window of opportunity in April that enabled several farmers to begin planting corn, before rains began late in the month.  This dry period in April also allowed for some spring tillage and herbicide applications, as well as fertilizer and manure applications to provide nutrients for the crops.


With the end of April bringing wet conditions and then cool temperatures, planting halted around the county.  A few soybean fields that were planted in April did not show much progress in growth.  Very little corn has emerged and some is a pale yellow color due to the excess moisture and cool temperatures.  Heavy rains caused ponding in some fields, raising concerns about the possible need for replanting.  Farmers are hoping for warmer temperatures and good drying conditions to allow previously planted crops to grow, and to resume planting corn and soybeans.  Once this activity begins, herbicides and/or tillage will need to be adapted to manage weeds that have advanced in growth due to inactivity in the fields since the rains in late April.

 

 

Township

Reporter

April 15-30, 2017

Growing Season (from Apr. 15-2017)

Blanchard Township

Crop Production Services

4.50

4.50

Buck Township

Heritage Cooperative/Kenton

3.31

3.31

Cessna Township

Steve Lowery

3.05

3.05

Dudley Township

Dale Rapp

2.55

2.55

Goshen Township

Brien Bros. Farm

3.19

3.19

Hale Township

Travis Ramsey

2.45

2.45

Jackson Township

Rick Weber

3.89

3.89

Liberty Township

Phil Epley

3.14

3.14

Lynn Township

Jan Layman

4.13

4.13

Marion Township

Mark Lowery

2.32

2.32

McDonald Township

Jerry Stout     

2.65

2.65

Pleasant Township

Robert McBride

3.29

3.29

Roundhead Township

Mike Lautenschlager

2.55

2.55

Taylor Creek Township

Silver Creek Supply

3.65

3.65

Washington Township

Randy Preston

2.76

2.76

 

Average

3.16

3.16

 

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Flooding, Compaction, Pneumonia Concerns of Region's Farmers

As much as 6 inches of rain has fallen since tractors entered the fields. Rob Wilson of Dunkirk says that the main concerns are flooding and soil compaction.

 

“The big thing is the flooding, it can deplete the oxygen in the soil and it has compacted the soil a lot. The extra wet conditions can cause the seed to rot, but from what I’ve seen, it looks like the seed is growing and the sprouts are coming. A lot of the corn is still growing like normal, but we have some compaction now.” Said Wilson.

 

Wilson comments on the rollercoaster temperatures impacting the area.

 

“We first thought that the cold temperatures weren’t really good. The ground temperature needs to be at least 50ºF for the corn to germinate and grow. It looks like the corn is growing. If we would’ve had real hot temperatures, it would’ve baked the soil and made it harder.

 

Wilson has some advice for young 4-H and FFA members raising livestock in this weather.

 

“Spend a little time with the animals. When you’re feeding them, listen for coughing, abnormal behavior, make sure they’re eating properly, and any signs of pneumonia. The sooner you catch it, the easier it is to cure.”


Click here to listen to my complete discussion with Wilson.

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Region's FFA Chapters Have Successful Convention

Ada

  • State degree recipients: Ashley Bridenbach, Maddie Gossard, Justin Light, Caitlyn Stover, and Hunter Purdy.

 

Kenton

  • Gold rated chapter - top 10% in the state.
  • Jared McNeely - 4th Place - Agricultural Services Proficiency.
  • Lauren Johnson - 4th Place - Agricultural Processing Proficiency.
  • Kolt Buchenroth - 1st Place - Agricultural Communication Proficiency.
  • Mackenzie Stover - Gold Rated Secretarires Book.
  • Delaney Althauser - Gold Rated Treasurers Book.
  • David Heilman - Gold Rated Reporters Book.
  • State degree recipieints: Kelli Haudenschield, Dillion Rall, Layne Taylor, Erin Unger, and Lauren Johnson.

 

Ridgemont

  • One of the top ten Chapters in Ohio.
  • Top ten in Building Communities and Strengthening Agriculture divisions.
  • #1 in growing leaders division.
  • State degree recipients: Meadow Cromer, Dillon Beiler, Nathan Rigdon, Dalton Tackett, Keaton Fout, Isaac Davis, and Alexis Elliott.
  • Nole Gerfen - 3rd Place - Swine Production Proficiency, 2nd Place - Forage Prodcution Proficiency, 1st Place -Diversified Agriculture Proficiency, Ohio Star Farmer.
  • Shaye Creamer- 2nd Place - Agriculture Education Proficiency.
  • Nathan Stacklin - 1st Place - Diversified Horticulture Proficiency.
  • Keaton Fout -1st Place - Forage Production Proficiency.

 

How did your chapter do at state convention? Do you have FFA news? Email it to kolt@wktn.com!

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Hardin Northern FFA Holds Banquet

On Thursday, April 13th the Hardin Northern FFA Chapter held its annual member banquet.

There were 65 members in attendance along with numerous parents, staff and community

members. This banquet marked a year end celebration of success for chapter members and

served as a thank you to the parents, staff and community members who support the chapter in

anyway. A large number of awards and scholarships were awarded at the banquet.

 

Award Winners were as followed: Senior, Holly Wilson was recognized as this year’s

Distinguished Member and Star Chapter Farmer. Senior, David Allen was recognized as this

year’s Star in AgriBusiness. Junior, Clair Wilson was selected as the recipient of the Ag Credit

110% Award. David Allen, Mikalea Ayers, Owen Bame, Samuel Diller, Catherine McMillion and

Holly Wilson were all awarded scholarships to assist them with their upcoming college

attendance in the fall. Along with awards for the members, each year the chapter awards an

Honorary Degree to a person who has went out of their way to help support them in anyway.

This year’s HN FFA honorary degree recipient was Patty Morris, the chapter can not thank Patty

enough for the support and dedication she has shown.

 

New Officer Team: Clair Wilson, Cassidy Deckling, Shelby Alloway, Rylie Bame, Cassidy Crooks and Ginnie Mills.

 

Rounding out the night was the installation of the 2017-2018 Officer Team. The newly installed team consists of Sentinel - Ginnie Mills, Reporter - Cassidy Crooks, Treasurer - Shelby Alloway, Secretary - Rylie Bame, Vice-President - Clair Wilson, President - Cassidy Deckling.

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Kenton FFA Banquet Held

Many awards were presented at the annual banquet, beginning with the chapter’s honorary degree. This degree is awarded to individuals that have had a significant impact on the Kenton FFA Chapter. This year’s recipient was Terrie Body.

Several FFA members received awards for career development events, as well as chapter, state and national awards:

  • Proficiency Awards: Jared McNeely - Top 4 in Ohio - Agricultural Services, Lauren Johnson - Top 4 in Ohio - Agricultural Processing, Kolt Buchenroth - Top 2 in Ohio - Agricultural Communication, Abbi Amweg - Agricultural Sales - Honorable Mention
  • State Degrees: Kelli Haudenschield, Lauren Johnson, Layne Taylor, Jonathan D. Rall, Erin Unger.
  • American Degrees: William Barrett, Haylie Sheldon


Kenton FFA Advisor, Mrs. Shalie Logan, presented the evening's special awards:

  • 110% Award: Jared McNeely
  • Star Chapter Greenhand: Garrett Thomas
  • Outstanding Sophomore: Kody Buchenroth
  • Outstanding Juniors: Delaney Althauser and Lauren Johnson
  • Outstanding Senior: Jared McNeely

New Leaders: Garrett Thomas, Olivia Whiting, Meredith Bischoff, Delaney Altauser,

Keeley Wright, Lauren Johnson, Erin Unger


Finally, the 2017-2018 Kenton FFA Officer Team was installed. The incoming officer team consists of Student Advisor - Erin Unger, Sentinel - Lauren Johnson, Reporter - Olivia Whiting, Treasurer - Meredith Bischoff, Secretary - Keeley Wright, Vice-President - Garrett Thomas, and President - Delaney Althauser.

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4-H Club Bake Sale A Success, Another Slated

The Boots and Buckles 4-H group met on Monday, April 17, 2017, at advisor Jolene Buchenroth's house at 6:30 p.m. The meeting started out with old business. The Boots and Buckles 4-H club held a bake sale on Saturday, April 8th, 2016. The bake sale was a success, and the Boots and Buckles 4-H group members would like to thank anybody who donated. New business is that the Boots and Buckles 4-H group will be having another bake sale Saturday, May 13, 2017. The proceeds will go to an organization or fund of the group's choosing. Announcements were after that. May 1st is the deadline to change your project if needed. May 15 is the procession deadline for the dairy beef feeders. May 27 is the mandatory shots and weigh in for dairy beef feeders from 8-10:30 at the Hardin County Fairgrounds. The meeting was then adjourned. Recreation was human shoots and ladders. Next meeting will be on Monday, May 8th, 2017 at Emma Arver's house at 6:30 p.m.

 

If you have 4-H news, email it to kolt@wktn.com.

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Small Farm Tour Held

Monica and Dennis von Stein share their experiences starting up Pure Country Greenhouses as part of the Small Farm Tour held April 8.

 

Six small farms were visited as part of the Auglaize and Hardin County New and Small Farm College this past Saturday, April 8.  The New and Small Farm College was an eight-week short course held at the Ohio State University Lima campus in February and March.  The purpose of the small farm tour was for class participants, either current owners or soon to be owners of small farm enterprises to see and ask questions of current small farm owners.  Each stop offered a time for the small farm owners to tell their story of their farm goals, issues, and successes.  The tour participants were able to see a variety of diverse production agriculture enterprises with different marketing plans throughout the day-long tour.

 

The small farm tour started out at Probst Family Farm near Bluffton.  This is a Certified Naturally Grown Farm with pastured-based meats including beef, pork, turkey, chicken, and eggs with farmer’s market experience.  Greg Probst is also the manager of the Bluffton Farmer’s Market.  The next stop on the tour was Pure Country Greenhouses near Rawson.  Monica and Dennis von Stein are the owners of this family owned and operated greenhouse business that has a variety of flowers, vegetables, hanging baskets, and arranged pots.  The von Steins were self-taught and operate their business on a seasonal basis, marketing their plants both on the farm and at the farmer’s market in addition to work on the family’s grain operation.  The final stop before lunch was Frisky Friends Farms outside of Ada where Chad and Jamie Hazelton raise hay, corn, dairy goats (of all breeds), Ayrshire dairy cattle, Dexter cattle, Pygmy goats, chickens, laying hens, hogs, rabbits, and horses.  Like many other small farms, the Hazelton family children are involved with the many daily chores to take care of the animals.


Peck-n-Coop Family Farm east of Kenton was the first afternoon stop on the tour. Raising dairy, poultry, sheep, and chickens are a part of John and Kriss Brien’s daily family routine to help teach responsibility to their children.  This farm has experience with Community Supported Agriculture (CSA), which customers pay a yearly fee to have access to farm products.  The next stop on the tour was the Brammell Family Sugar Shack, also located east of Kenton.  Maple sugar tapping and processing and tree planting plans for future growth was a topic of discussion at this alternative agriculture farm owned by Shelby and Kyle Brammell.  The operation recently purchased a maple syrup evaporator for use in their sugar shack that was built from timbers taken from a family barn.  A commercial fruit and vegetable farm was the final stop on the Small Farm Tour.  Levi Yoder Greenhouse & Produce, located east of Kenton produces flowers, mums, strawberries, pumpkins, melons, and many other fruits and vegetables marketed through the Scioto Valley Produce Auction as well as from the farm.  Yoder is the manager of this local produce auction that serves as a market for several local produce growers.  Each stop on the tour provided an opportunity for the participants to see examples of local agricultural enterprises and find out how each contributed to the entrepreneur’s success.  Pictures of the Auglaize and Hardin County Small Farm Tour can be viewed on the Hardin County OSU Extension Facebook page.

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Ridgemont FFA Banquet Held

Many awards were presented at the annual banquet, beginning with the chapter’s honorary degrees. These degrees were awarded to individuals that have had a significant impact on the Ridgemont FFA Chapter. This year’s recipients are Ashley Ledley, Andrew Gandert, Andrew Scharf, Ernie and Amy Davis, Dixie Derke, and Keegan McKee.

 

Several FFA members received awards for service learning activities, and career development events, as well as state and national awards:

 

  • State Gold Science Fair, National Science Fair Bronze Finalist: Cameron Bright, Colin Freshcorn

  • Star State FFA Degree Candidate: Nole Gerfen - Star State Farmer Candidate, Nathan Stacklin - Star State Ag Business Candidate

  • State Proficiency Awards: Keaton Fout, Nole Gerfen, Shaye Creamer, Nathan Stacklin

  • National Swine Entrepreneurship Winner: Nole Gerfen

Ridgemont FFA Advisor Mrs. Stephanie Jolliff

 

Ridgemont FFA Advisor, Mrs. Stephanie Jolliff, presented the evening's special awards:

 

  • 110% Award: Taylor Cronely and Nashley Robinson

  • Star Chapter Greenhand: Larrah Lones, Mackenzie Radar

  • Lauren Ledley Legacy Award: Shaye Creamer

2017-2018 Ridgemont FFA President, Alexis Elliott


Finally, the 2017-2018 Ridgemont FFA Officer Team was installed. I had the chance to speak with newly installed president, Alexis Elliott, who shared why she is an FFA Officer.

 

"Being an officer is just a title, but that title gives me the privledge to honor other FFA members here at banquet and throughout the year." Stated Elliott.

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Good Agriculture Practices Class Scheduled

A Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) class has been planned for Hardin County.  GAPs classes are training sessions for fruit and vegetable producers taught by personnel from Ohio State University’s Fruit and Vegetable Safety Program.  The April 5th program will be from 12:30 – 3:30 pm at the Scioto Valley Produce Auction, 18715 County Road 200, Mt. Victory.  The GAPs class is open to all fruit and vegetable producers and will be presented without technology.  Attending an OSU GAPs class does not equate to being ‘GAPs Certified.’

 

GAPs training programs through OSU provide growers with the knowledge and tools needed to implement on-farm best management practices to reduce fresh produce safety hazards and ensure that their product is safe.  Trainings are three hours and participants receive a certificate of completion at the end of the training.  Each participant also receives recordkeeping materials and factsheets.  The class costs growers $20, which helps to cover the expense of training materials.  These programs are made possible through a grant from the Ohio Department of Agriculture.

 

GAPS are a series of voluntary management guidelines that can help to reduce the risks of microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables. GAPs can be incorporated into any production system and targets pre-harvest and post-harvest practices.  GAPs address four major routes of foodborne pathogen contamination of fresh produce: water, waste, wildlife and workers.  For more information on GAPs programs, go to producesafety.osu.edu.  Please contact Mark Badertscher, Hardin County OSU Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources at 419-674-2297 to register for the class.

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Ada FFA Holds Annual Banquet

The annual Ada FFA banquet was held Wednesday March 29th in the cafeteria at Ada High School

 

During the meal, Emma Jameson presented our annual slide show. The slide show was the highlight of the evening. It gave parents, as well as community members, a chance  to see what the FFA really does throughout the year.

 

The Honorary Ada Chapter degrees were awarded to Christina Henderson, Ty and Heather Etgen for their outstanding service to the group.

 

 Members of the Parliamentary Procedure teams, Public Speaking, and Soil Judging contestants were recognized.

Leadership and scholarship pins were also handed out to those who qualified. In the area of proficiency awards, the following members received recognition:

 

Kaitlyn Long- Dairy, Goat Production

Caitlyn Stover- Beef Production, Dairy, Diversified Livestock, Fruit Sales

Ashley Breidenbach- Grain Production

Maddie Gossard- Sheep Production

Hunter Purdy- Swine Production,Ag Education

Justin Light- Ag Repair/Maint.

Emma Jameson-Poultry

Nicki Lehsten-Vegetable Production

Nathan Mattson-Landscape Management

 

From there, FFA Advisor Tony Dyer presented the top chapter awards. The 110% award was given to Justin Light.  Sidney Gossard received the Outstanding Freshmen award, Outstanding Sophomore was Nathan Mattson, Maddie Gossard was named Outstanding Junior, and Hunter Purdy received Outstanding Senior. Mason Waugh earned the Outstanding Ag Mechanics, DeKalb Award was Kaitlyn Long. Josie Poling earned the Star Green Hand award, while Caitlyn Stover received the Star Chapter Farmer award.

 

New Ada FFA Officers Installed: Ella Poling, Maddie Gossard, Sidney Gossard, Nathan Mattson,

Caitlyn Stover, Emma Jameson, Nicki Lehsten, and Noah Mattson

 

As the evening was coming to an end, the new officers were installed into their offices. This included President Caitlyn Stover, Vice President Maddie Gossard, Secretary Emma Jameson, Reporter Sidney Gossard, Sentinel Noah Mattson, Student Advisor Nathan Mattson, Chaplain Ella Poling, and the Treasurer Nicole Lehsten.

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Ambassador Team Introduced at Annual Beef Banquet

 

2017 Beef Ambassador Team: MeKenzie and Madisen Jolliff. Not Pictured is Brian Searson.

 

Kicking off the annual beef banquet was the introduction of the 2017 Beef Ambassador Team which consists of MeKenzie Jolliff, Madisen Jolliff, and Brian Searson. A team is chosen rather than a single queen in an effort to include more exhibitors, and expand opportunities and event coverage.

 

The team aims to grow the beef industry as a whole and get people involved in the production of beef cattle. I had the chance to talk briefly with both Madisen and MeKenzie.

 

 

 

Scholarship Recipients: Taylor Cronley and Cam Deckling. Not Pictured are NIcole Southerland,

Molly Wilson, and Holly Wilson.

 

Also recognized were the commodity’s scholarship recipients. They are Taylor Cronley, Cam Deckling, Nicole Southerland, Molly WIlson, and Holly Wilson.

 

Tony and Cheryl Good were awarded the annual service award for their years of service to the cattle producers.


All Junior Fair Beef Exhibitors and Rate of Gain Winners were recognized as well.

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Pork Queen Crowned, Scholarships Awarded

2016 Pork Queen Sarah Thomas, 2017 Pork Queen Erica Jacobs, 2016 Hardin County Fair Queen Holly Wilson

 

The highlight of any commodity banquet is the crowning of the commodity's queen. Erica Jacobs was crowned this year's pork queen. Jacobs describes what inspired her to run for queen

 

"I've shown pigs since I was in third grade and before that I did Pee Wee showmanship. I love the fair, and I love pork and I just want to promote it." Said Jacobs.

 

Jacobs talks about her goals for herself as queen.

 

"I plan to go to a lot of the county fairs and go to their pork shows and work with the Pork Producers and promote the pork industry." Jacobs said.

 

Jacobs had to fill out an application, participate in an interview, and give a speech. Her speech focused on the vast uses for pork, and expansion opportunities in the pork industry.

 

2016 Queen Sarah Thomas shared her experiences of the last year, and extended her thanks to the county pork producers for allowing her the opportunity to have the experience.

 

Scholarship Recipients Sarah Thomas, Holly Wilson, and Taylor Cronley.

Not picutred: Ashley Breidenbach, Cameron Smith, and Faith Holbrook

 

6 $500 Scholarships were also awarded to Holly Wilson, Sarah Thomas, Ashley Breidenbach, Taylor Cronley, Cameron Smith, and Faith Holbrook.

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Farm Safety Day Set

OSU Extension and the Hardin County Farm Bureau are holding a Farm Safety Day on Saturday, March 18 at Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative, 1210 W. Lima Street, Kenton.  This free event will start at 8:30 am with donuts, coffee, and juice.  It will meet the requirements for a Workers Compensation two hour safety meeting for farmers who hire employees to work on their farm.  Wayne Dellinger, OSU Extension Educator from Union County will do a presentation on Farm Safety, including information about working with pesticides and other chemicals, grain handling, farm equipment, and roadway hazards.  

 

There will also be a grain bin rescue demonstration from the Kenton Fire Department on the OSU Comprehensive Agricultural Rescue Trailer (CART).  This CART is a portable grain rescue training modular suitable for agricultural rescue and other safety educational programs for agricultural audiences.  While the CART is in Hardin County, the Ohio Fire Academy will provide agricultural training for both the Kenton Fire Department and volunteer firefighters separate from the Farm Safety Day.  Every 10 years, 235 farmers lose their life in an agricultural-related accident. Grain bin fatalities are steadily increasing each year.  Such fatalities occur for a variety of reasons with the two most common being suffocation by engulfment and entanglement with moving parts.  In addition to a grain bin rescue demonstration, the CART includes other safety topics such as entanglements with augers, preventing falls from ladders and other heights, as well as electrical safety.

 

Another activity happening in the afternoon of the Farm Safety Day on March 18 will be the hands-on portion of the Tractor Safety and Machinery Operation for Youth training course that has been taking place during February and March at the OSU Extension Spark Lab.  Students enrolled in this course will be completing their written test and participating in both the Pre-Operational Skills Test and Driving Skills Test portion of the training for certification.  This skills training will begin at 1:00 pm, and if time permits, will allow an opportunity for adult farmers to participate in the pre-operational and driving skills course.  Both the morning session and afternoon session are open to the public who may attend free of charge, as made possible by the sponsorship of the Hardin County Farm Bureau.  Please call the Farm Bureau office at 419-523-5874 to pre-register so that there will be enough food and accommodations for those who plan to attend.

 

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Dairy Service Unit Spring Cheese Sale

The Hardin County Dairy Service Unit is holding their semi-annual cheese sale.  The spring sale has a variety of cheeses to choose from including Colby, Muenster, Smoked Cheddar, Mozzarella, Marble, American Processed, Farmers Cheese, Cheddar, Big Eye Swiss, Baby Swiss, Lacey Swiss (low cholesterol, low fat), Hot Pepper, and also Trail Bologna.  Cheese is in approximately 2 pound units, except for Muenster, American Processed, and Hot Pepper Cheese, which are sold in 5 pound loaves.  The American Processed Cheese is also sliced.  The Trail Bologna comes in 1-1 3/4 pound rings.

 

Order forms can be obtained at the Extension Office, 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103 in Kenton or online at hardin.osu.edu.  The deadline for ordering cheese is March 22, with pick-up dates March 31 from 12:00 pm to 7:00 pm or April 1 from 9:00 am until 12:00 pm at Dan and Molly Wagner’s dairy farm.  Funds from the semi-annual cheese sale are used to support dairy youth activities such as scholarships, royalty, awards, and other activities planned by the Dairy Service Unit.  Orders not picked up will be considered canceled.  No deliveries will be made and payment is due at pick-up.


The Dairy Service Unit will hold its annual meeting on March 29 at the OSU Extension office with a dairy industry guest speaker to be announced.  The annual meeting meal will be ham sandwiches, cheese, chips, salads, and desserts.  Families attending are asked to bring either a salad or dessert.  The meal will begin at 7:00 pm with the meeting to follow at 7:30 pm.

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Lamb and Wool Queen Crowned, Scholarships Awarded

Mickayla Grauel was first recognized as the 2016 Hardin County Fair Grand Champion Market Lamb Exhibitor. Ashtin Elliott was also recognized for being the Exhibitor of the Born and Raised Champion Lamb.

 

Alex Ramsey and Shaye Creamer

 

Shaye Creamer and Alex Ramsey were each awarded a $500 scholarship. Creamer will be attending Wilmington College majoring in Agriculture Education and minoring in Animal Sciences. Ramsey will go on to study Agriculture Systems at Purdue University. These scholarships are funded by the sheep improvement’s concession booth at the Hardin County Fair, and through a silent auction, held at the annual banquet.

 

2016 Lamb and Wool Queen, Claire Wilson, thanked the association for their support and for the opportunity to serve as the queen. Wilson then passed her crown to the newly crowned 2017 queen, Alexis Elliott.

 

 

2016 Lamb and Wool Queen Claire Wilson, 2017 Lamb and Wool Queen Alexis Elliott, 2016 Hardin County Fair Queen Holly Wilson

 

In her speech, Elliott spoke about wool’s rich history in America and it’s founding. She explains what she hopes to accomplish during her reign.

 

“I hope to attend as many fairs as possible while promoting the lamb and wool industry to not just Rural America, but urban cities as well. Said Elliott.


Elliott also noted that more comes from the lamb industry then meat and wool. By-products such as Lanolin are also consumed. Lanolin is a natural moisturizer found in sheep’s wool. The animals use it to keep their fleeces clean. As consumers, we use lanolin in makeup, moisturisers, tanning lotions, and more.

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Riverdale FFA Chapter Competes in Public Speaking Contest

The Riverdale FFA Chapter recently had 4 members compete in the Sub-District Public Speaking contest. This contest develops agricultural leaders by providing FFA members the opportunity to develop oral communication skills through agricultural public speaking. In Creed Speaking, Danielle Little placed 9th out of 12. In advanced preparedm, Maria Shane placed 3rd out of 5, and in extemporaneous, Cara Pauley placed 6th and Lizzy Shane placed 5th out of 7.

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County Beef Banquet Set

The Hardin County Cattle Producers will hold their annual Beef Banquet on Saturday, March 25 in the Community Building at the fairgrounds, starting at 6:00 pm.  Pre-sale Adult tickets are $13, Children (ages 7-18) $6.50, and 2016 Hardin County Junior Fair Beef Barn Exhibitors FREE with a reservation given to any Cattle Producers Director by March 24th.  Tickets at the door will be $15.

 

Tickets can be purchased from the following county Cattle Producers Directors: Holli Underwood, Adam Billenstein, Deana Gibson, Dane Jeffers, Derek Dunson, Marcia Hoovler, Stacia Hall, Traci Deckling, Aaron Hensel, or Jeff Oestreich.

 

The Hardin County Beef Ambassador Program (HCBAP) provides an opportunity for youth to educate consumers and students about beef nutrition, food safety and stewardship practices of the beef industry.  The Beef Ambassador Team will promote the beef industry as they develop skills of leadership, communication and self-confidence.  The Beef Ambassador Program seeks to educate team members about the beef industry so that they may be better prepared to tell their own story regarding agriculture.  

 

To compete in the HCBAP annual contest, participants must be 14-19 years of age as of January 1, 2017.  Participants or their families must be members of the Hardin County Cattle Producers at the time of application.  Upon entrance into the HCBAP, contestants must prepare a short statement (30 words or less) outlining their message to consumers and submit the statement with the application.  This statement will be used to compliment further performance during the contest to determine the program’s strongest contestants. There will be 1-3 youth selected as Hardin County Beef Ambassadors.

 

Individuals may compete for a place on the ambassador team as long as they are eligible.  Contestants may not enter any competition to serve as an ambassador for a competitive commodity group while serving as a Hardin County Beef Ambassador.  Applications must be returned by March 17 to the OSU Extension Office, Hardin County, or to Marcia Hoovler at 17838 County Road 65, Belle Center, OH 43310.

 

The Hardin County Cattle Producers are offering up to five-$500 scholarships to qualified students for the 2017-18 school year.  Scholarships will be awarded to applicants who themselves or their parents are current members of the Hardin County Cattle Producers or currently have a beef cattle project in either 4-H or FFA.  For an application, please contact the FFA Advisor or high school guidance counselor at any of the county schools.  You can also download an application from hardin.osu.edu or pick one up at the OSU Extension office located at 1021 West Lima Street, Suite 103 in Kenton.  Completed applications and transcripts are to be submitted to the Hardin County Extension Office or to Marcia Hoovler by March 17.  Questions regarding the Hardin County Beef Ambassador program and scholarship process can be directed to Marcia Hoovler at 937-538-1537.

 

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Cromer Named Princess, Annual Dairy Banquet Held

Former Dairy Princess Hope Hazelton began the event by speaking about her recent trip to Australia as an internship program through the Ohio State University’s Agricultural Technical Institute or ATI. Hazelton, who was also the Ohio Ayrshire Queen this past year, is studying Dairy Cattle Production and Management, and spent her summer working on four dairy farms across Australia.

 

2017 Dairy Princess Meadow Cromer and 2016 Hardin County Fair Queen Holly Wilson


Also at the banquet Meadow Cromer of the Ridgemont FFA Chapter was named the Dairy Princess for the second time. Cromer served as the princess last year, and aims to continue on her mission to educate both youth and adults on dairy cattle and the industry.

 

Croft Bauer, Scholarship Recipient


Croft Bauer and Brady Weaver were both awarded scholarships for use in their education. Weaver is a student at OSU ATI studying dairy cattle. Bauer is a senior at Upper Scioto Valley High School and is planning to attend Bowling Green State University to study Dietetics. 

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Pesticide Recertification Training Slated

Some farmers have received a notice that informs them that their current pesticide applicator license will expire at the end of March 2017 and that they must complete their continuing education hours to renew before this date.  The cost of renewal for this process will be a total of $65.  Thirty dollars is sent to the Ohio Department of Agriculture for the license itself and $35 to OSU Extension for the continuing education requirement.

 

Farmers must have a private applicator license to apply restricted use pesticides on their farm or for an employer’s crops.  A commercial license is required for individuals who apply products on fields other than their own or as a business.  The Environmental Protection Agency determines whether a product is designated restricted or general use.  Restricted use products may be organic or traditional pesticides.

 

To obtain a private applicator license, farmers must pass a series of exams that test their competency in pesticide safety and application knowledge.  They also must be certified in one or more of seven categories in addition to Core knowledge.  These categories include Grain and Cereal Crops, Forage Crops and Livestock, Fruit and Vegetable Crops, Nursery and Forest Crops, Greenhouse Crops, Fumigation, and Specialty Uses.

 

A license must be renewed every three years.  A farmer can meet this requirement by completing three hours of approved pesticide continuing education anytime during the three year period.  Recertification training emphasizes effective management strategies that enhance crop productivity, encourage responsible use of products, and promote safe practices for applicators, the public, and the environment.  OSU Extension offices are currently offering recertification programs to fulfill the three hours of the continuing education requirement for license renewal.  A farmer may also choose to retest every three years to renew a private pesticide license.

 

The Hardin County Pesticide Applicator Training (PAT) program will be offered Tuesday, March 14 at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory.  The session will begin at 9:00 am and end at 12:00 pm.  This session is for private applicators and will consist of Core, Grain and Cereal Crops, Forage Crops and Livestock, and Fumigation.  Farmers must pre-register online at http://pested.osu.edu or pick up a registration form to mail in from the Extension Office at 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103 in Kenton.  Further information regarding recertification in other areas can be obtained by contacting the Extension office before March 31.

 

A two-hour fertilizer certification program for any applicator that has a pesticide license will be also be offered on March 14, from 1:00 – 3:00 pm at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory.  This training is in combination with the pesticide recertification and will meet the certification requirements only for those with a pesticide license.  If a fertilizer applicator already has a yellow fertilizer certification card that says it expires on March 31, 2017, this fertilizer certification card will be automatically renewed by ODA without going through additional fertilizer certification training in 2017.  The deadline for fertilizer certification is September 30, 2017.  Pre-registration is required and you can register by calling the Hardin County Extension office at 419-674-2297.


Training dates for Commercial Pesticide Applicators can be found at http://pested.osu.edu/commercialapplicator.  Training dates for Private Pesticide Applicators for other counties in Ohio may be found at http://pested.osu.edu/privateapplicator.  The commercial and private applicator licenses are another way that commercial pesticide applicators and farmers show good stewardship in caring for our land and producing our food in a sustainable and environmentally responsible manner.

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Conservation Tillage Conference Scheduled

So you think you are ready to make an effort to improve soil health?  Wondering how to produce corn in the most profitable and environmentally safe way?  Do you want to know how to fit cover crops into your operation?  Maybe you are looking for ways to apply manure to make the most efficient use of your nutrients.  Ready to find a way to make better use of the technology integrated into your tractor, combine, planter, or sprayer?  Will the new herbicide management programs give that bump in soybean yield you’ve been looking for?  Are you ready test your ideas with on-farm research, develop a nutrient management plan, or make that move to a no-till system?

 

These are all questions you might have asked yourself, but have struggled to find an answer.  This year’s Conservation Tillage Conference (CTC) has the answers to these questions and many more.  The McIntosh Center at Ohio Northern University will once again be the location were about 60 presenters, several agribusiness exhibitors, and approximately 900 participants will come together March 7th and 8th in Ada, Ohio.  Add value to your operation by learning new ideas and technologies to expand your agronomic crops knowledge.

 

A general session with ag engineer Paul Jasa from the University of Nebraska discussing a Systems Approach to No-till and Soil Health, Corn University, Advanced Cover Crops, Manure Nutrient Management, and Technologies to Support On-Farm Decisions are the sessions that make up day one.  On the second day, conference participants will be able to choose from Soybean School, Quantifying Soil Health, Conducting On farm Research: Does it Really Work?, Conservation Assessment and Planning, and Transitioning to No-till.


Find out what experts from OSU Extension, OARDC, USDA, and SWCD are learning from the latest research about the timely topics that affect today’s farmers, crop consultants, and agribusiness professionals who are out in the field working together to produce crops in an efficient and environmentally responsible manner.  Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) and Certified Livestock Manager (CLM) credits will be available to those who attend.  Visit ctc.osu.edu and make plans to participate in this year’s Conservation Tillage Conference by February 27 to take advantage of early registration rates.

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Extension To Host Fertilizer Training

Agricultural fertilizer applicator certification is now required for farmers who apply fertilizer to more than 50 acres of agricultural production grown primarily for sale. This requirement was signed into law in June 2014, and also requires certification for commercial agricultural fertilizer applicators. Farmers who have their fertilizer applied by co-ops or custom applicators are not required to be certified.

 

Farmers and commercial applicators need to attend a training course offered by Ohio State University Extension to become certified. Those who have a pesticide applicator license need to attend a two-hour fertilizer certification. If an applicator does not have a pesticide license, they will be required to attend a three-hour fertilizer certification. Fertilizer applicators who received Fertilizer Applicator Certification Training in the fall of 2014, during 2015 or 2016 do not need to be trained again in 2017. Applicators who are a Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) or Certified Livestock Manager (CLM) are not required to attend the training.

 

Fertilizer is defined for the regulation as any substance containing nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, or other plant nutrient in a dry or liquid formulation. All application types such as broadcast, side dress, sub-surface, knifing and other are included in the certification requirement. Lime and limestone are not included as fertilizer for the certification and farmers who only use starter fertilizer in their planter boxes are exempted. The agriculture fertilizer certification is not required for manure applications as these are currently regulated, unless farmers are applying livestock or poultry manure from a Concentrated Animal Feeding Facility (CAFF).  In this case, they would need to have either the CLM or Ohio Fertilizer Certification.

 

A three-hour certification program for any applicator who does not have a pesticide license will be offered March 6 from 6:00 - 9:00 pm at The Inn at Ohio Northern University. The address for the location is 401 West College Avenue, Ada. Please arrive by 5:30 pm so that materials can be distributed and the program can start on time. This free training will meet the certification requirements for those with and without a pesticide license. There will also be a two-hour certification program on March 14 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm for applicators who currently hold a pesticide license.  This training will be held at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory as part of the annual pesticide recertification training. Pre-registration is required for both the Ada and Mt. Victory locations. Online registration is available at nutrienteducation.osu.edu. You can also register by calling the Hardin County Extension office at 419-674-2297.


Applicators who meet the criteria for the fertilizer certification must attend training by September 30, 2017. The Ohio Department of Agriculture is the agency issuing the certification for agriculture fertilizer applications. Once an applicator completes the fertilizer training, the ODA will bill them $30 for their fertilizer certificate unless the applicator currently holds a pesticide applicator license. Their website has information regarding the regulation at agri.ohio.gov. For more information about other training sessions or general materials for the agriculture fertilizer certification, visit nutrienteducation.osu.edu or contact Mark Badertscher, Hardin County OSU Extension at badertscher.4@osu.edu.

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County Pork Banquet Slated

The Hardin County Pork Producers will hold their annual Pork Banquet on Saturday, March 11 at St. John’s Evangelical Church, starting at 6:30 pm. The fun-filled evening will include selection of the Queen and Scholarship Recipients as well as amazing food and door prizes.  Ticket prices are $8, and half price for 2016 Hardin County Junior Fair Swine Exhibitors, as well as Fair Workers from the Food Pavilion, and children under the age of 12.

 

The banquet is open to all interested persons but advance tickets are required.  Tickets can be purchased through March 6 from the following county Pork Producers Directors: Grant Mizek, Kevin (Dewey) Skidmore, Steve Searson, Doug & Christine Heilman, Tim Holbrook, Mark Watkins, Rob Wilson, Matthew Holbrook, Lavern & Nancy Weaver, Rob Underwood, Nathan Weaver, Tyler & Tiffany Sparks, Rusty Bingham, Wes VanScoy, and Jody Dye.  Tickets can also be obtained from the Extension office at 1021 West Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton.

 

The Hardin County Pork Producers are offering six $500 scholarships to qualified students.  Scholarships will be awarded to one student from each of the six county schools.  For an application, please contact the FFA Advisor or high school guidance counselor at any of the county schools.  You can also download an application from hardin.osu.edu or pick one up at the OSU Extension office.  Completed applications are to be mailed to Douglas Heilman, 10333 County Road 265, Kenton, Ohio 43326.  The deadline for returning the completed scholarship application is March 1, 2017.

 

The Pork Producers are also looking for 2017 Pork Queen Contestants.  Eligible candidates for the title of Hardin County Pork Queen must be age 15 through 19 as of January 1, 2017.  In order to be eligible for State Pork Industry Queen contest, the entrant must be 17 prior to January 1 of the year they will be competing.  Anyone qualified and interested can become Hardin County Pork Queen, but only those who reside on a farm on which hogs are raised and is the daughter of parents now actively engaged in the production of pork will be eligible for the District III Contest in 2017.  Contestants must complete an entry form to enter the contest.


For further information or an entry form, please contact the Ohio State University Extension office, call 419-674-2297, or visit hardin.osu.edu to download an application.  Entries should be mailed to Nancy Weaver, 9380 County Road 265, Kenton, Ohio 43326 by March 1, 2017.  Selection will be held before a panel of judges at the Pork Banquet on Saturday, March 11, 2017.

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Riverdale FFA Award Applications Evaluated

After a year of hard work, the Riverdale FFA sent numerous books, degrees, and awards to the Regional Evaluation. Secretary, Cara Pauley, earned a gold rating on her officer book. Treasurer, Breanah Shane, earned a gold rating on her officer boo. Reporter, Carrol Pauley received a gold rating on her officer book. Max Corbin, Carrol Pauley, Kori Frey, Lindsay Nichols, and Breanah Shane all submitted their State FFA degree. Max Corbin, Rianne Kruiter, and Natalie Snook all submitted their American FFA degree. Cara Pauley completed a proficiency in small animal production and care. All degrees and award applications advanced to the State for further evaluation.

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Become an OSU Extension Master Gardener

The OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers of Allen, Hardin and Hancock County will be offering the Master Gardener Volunteer training program at the OSU-Lima Campus this spring.  This program provides 50 hours of intensive training in horticulture to interested gardeners who then commit to 50 hours of volunteer service in their home county assisting with Master Gardener Volunteer sponsored educational programs and activities for residents.  Volunteer opportunities and projects vary by county.

Specialists from the Ohio State University Extension and experienced Master Gardener Volunteers will be teaching sessions along with some local experts.  Some topics include botany, plant selection, landscaping with annuals and perennials, vegetable gardening, tree selection and identification, fruit tree care, pesticides, soils and plant and insect identification.

The classes will begin Tuesday, March 7 and run through April 25.  The classes will be held 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. each Tuesday and Thursday evening.  Additionally, a full day seminar will be held on Saturday, March 18 as part of the curriculum.

The fee for the course is $150 per person which covers the cost of an extensive resource book and other resource materials.  All Master Gardener Volunteers will also be required to have a background check.  The classes will be held at the Ohio State University – Lima Campus.

If you are interested in taking the class and would like more information, you can do so by contacting your local Extension Office.  More information is available at allen.osu.edu; hardin.osu.edu; or hancock.osu.edu websites.  Class registration deadline is February 20.

For more information about the Hardin County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers, visit their Facebook page.  Go to mastergardener.osu.edu to find out more about OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers.  You can also call the Hardin County Extension office at (419) 674-2297 or email Dave McPheron (plantman12@windstream.net) for more information and to obtain an enrollment form.

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Annual Lamb Banquet Slated

The Hardin County Sheep Improvement Association will hold their annual Lamb Banquet on Saturday, March 4 at St. John’s Evangelical Church in Kenton at 6:30 pm.  Tickets for the banquet can be obtained from the Extension office at 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton.  Adult tickets are $15, Children $7, and 2016 Hardin County Junior Fair Sheep Exhibitors FREE with a reservation given at 419-674-2297 by February 24.  Banquet guests are asked to arrive early to participate in the silent auction bidding for various items that were donated to provide funds for the scholarship program.

 

Tickets can be purchased until February 24 from the following county Sheep Improvement Association Directors: Dave Ramsey, Megan Burgess, Scott Elliott, Cory Wagner, Dave Burkhart, Kristie Fay, Max Garmon, Don Haudenschield, Kenny Williams, Jeff Bowers, Bruce Oberlitner, Peter Previte, or Russell Senning.  Tickets can also be purchased from Madelyn Lowery.  The banquet entertainment will consist of dinner music provided by the band ‘In a Jam’.  A dinner will be prepared with various cuts of lamb for the banquet guests to enjoy.

 

The Hardin County Sheep Improvement Association is looking for 2017 Lamb & Wool Queen contestants and scholarship applicants.  A queen applicant and her parent/guardian must be residents of Hardin County or a Hardin County School District prior to entering the contest, and live on a farm where sheep are produced or have a sheep project in the Hardin County Junior Fair to be eligible.  Applicants must be 15 to 20 years of age as of January 1, 2017.  Contestants must complete an entry form.  For further information about the Lamb & Wool Queen contest, please contact the Sheep Improvement Association Queen Committee Chair, Kristie Fay at 419-673-8264.

 

The Hardin County Sheep Improvement Association is also offering two five hundred dollar scholarships to students entering/attending college for the 2017-2018 school year.  An applicant and his/her parent/guardian must be residents of Hardin County or a Hardin County School District prior to entering college, and must have had a sheep project and shown at the Hardin County Fair.  The applicant must be maintaining a 2.5 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

 

For more information about the scholarship, please contact the Sheep Improvement Association Scholarship Committee Chair, Peter Previte at 419-634-2202.  Applications and rules for both the Hardin County Lamb & Wool Queen and the Scholarship are available from your school’s FFA advisor, high school guidance counselor, or can be obtained from the OSU Extension office and its website at hardin.osu.edu.  Applications must be received at the Hardin County Extension Office by February 24, 2017.

 

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Horse Banquet Held, Royalty Crowned

Hardin County Horse Royalty Court and Candidates. Also Pictured is Holly Wilson, 2016 Fair Queen.

 

The highlight of any commodity banquet is the crowning of the commodity’s royalty court. This year’s Horse royalty court is as follows: King Brent Fowler, Queen Maddy Newman, Prince Kaden Guinn, and Princess Chloe Anderson. Fowler is a member of the Silver Creek Sliders 4-H club and says that he would like to make showing horses more convenient for exhibitors, and make supplies more readily available. Newman, of the the Ridgemont FFA Chapter, explains that she would like to help get younger exhibitors involved, and make the  experience of showing horses less stressful.

 

Left to Right: Queen Maddy Newman, King Brent Fowler, Prince Kaden Guinn, Princess Chloe Anderson

 

 

“Definitely getting kids more involved with 4-H because a lot of them, even when they are involved, they seem more stressed out than anything. I want to make them realize that it doesn’t have to be stressful and that it can be actually a lot of fun and just enjoyable.” Said Newman.


The Horse 2016 King Jared McNeely thanked the Hardin County Horse Council, and the Hardin County Extension Office as well as those 4-H Club Advisors, Members and community members in attendance for their continued support of the County Horse Program.

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Dairy Banquet Slated, Scholarship Announced

The annual Hardin County Dairy Banquet will be held on Saturday, February 25 at 12:00 noon at the Plaza Inn Restaurant, Mt. Victory.  Tickets this year are $13.00 for adults and $7.00 for children 12 and under.  Junior Fair Dairy Exhibitors from the 2016 Hardin County Fair are eligible for a complimentary ticket by contacting the Extension office.

Tickets are available until February 17 from the following county Dairy Service Unit Directors: Philip Bauer, Nate Cromer, Keith and Jean Dirkson, Corey Ledley, Chad Hazelton, Bret Rager, Larry and Janice Rall, Parry Rall, Vaughn Rall, Clair and Sue Sanders, Dan and Molly Wagner, or from the Extension Office at 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton.  The entertainment for the banquet will be Hope Hazelton sharing photos and experiences from her internship working on an Australian dairy farm.

 

The Hardin County Dairy Service Unit will be awarding a scholarship at their annual banquet.  Funds raised from the association’s semi-annual cheese sale are used to support higher education with this scholarship program.  Eligible students must live on a dairy farm, have been raised on a dairy farm, work on a dairy farm, be pursuing a dairy related education, or have shown a dairy heifer or dairy cow project at the Hardin County Fair.  

 

The Dairy Service Unit is also looking for a 2017 Dairy Princess.  The Dairy Princess will represent the Hardin County Dairy Service Unit with promotion of the dairy industry at the county fair and other scheduled activities.  Contestants must be unmarried, age 15 to 19 inclusive, or freshman in high school as of January 1, 2017.  They must live on a dairy farm, must have a dairy project in 4-H or FFA and show at the fair, or work on a dairy farm.

 

Applications can be picked up at the Extension office for both the scholarship and princess at 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103 in Kenton or from Hardin County FFA advisors, high school guidance counselors, or download the application from hardin.osu.edu.  Both the dairy scholarship application and the dairy princess entry form must be completed and returned to the Extension office by February 17, 2017.

 

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Cover Crop Workshop to be Held

Farmers will have the opportunity to learn about cover crops in a one day workshop at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory on Friday, February 10.  This program will be held in the banquet room of the Plaza Inn, 491 S Main Street, Mount Victory, OH 43340.  The workshop will begin at 8:30 am and end at 3:30 pm.  The cost of the all day workshop will be $25 and will include lunch, snacks, and reference materials.  This workshop will review some key cover crops knowledge taught at last year’s program as well as build on that subject matter by offering advanced cover crop information and timely topics related to this conservation and cropping practice.


Topics taught during the workshop will include benefits of cover crops, which cover crops to plant based on a grower’s goals and crop rotation, when to plant various cover crops, methods of planting cover crops, how to terminate cover crops, seed mixes, voles, moles, and slugs.  Another topic being presented at the 2017 Cover Crops Workshop is using cover crops to build soil mycorrhizae to improve soil health and therefore increase soil fertility while protecting soil from erosion and compaction.
 

Instructors for the workshop will be Jim Hoorman, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Alan Sundermeier, OSU Extension – Wood County, Mark Badertscher, OSU Extension – Hardin County, and Wayne Dellinger, OSU Extension – Union County.  For more information, go to http://hardin.osu.edu/ or call the Hardin County Extension office at 419-674-2297 for details and to register.  Participants need to be pre-registered by February 3.

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OSU Extension Certifying Youth in Machine Safety

A Tractor Safety and Machinery Operation certification course for youth has been scheduled for Wednesday evenings from February 1 through March 8 through OSU Extension.  March 15 is a possible make-up day in the event of inclement weather.  The six sessions will go from 6:00-9:00 pm in the OSU Extension office Spark Lab, 1021 W Lima Street, Kenton.  There will be an exam at the conclusion of the course, along with a hands-on operation skills course component that is planned for Saturday, March 18 at the Hardin County Fairgrounds as part of the Community Farm Safety Day planned by Farm Bureau.  This certification course is recommended for youth ages 14-15 who will be operating farm machinery either on their parents’ farm or someone else’s farm.  Individuals successfully completing the course will receive a certification card.  Other ages can observe the class, but are not able to be certified until age 14.  Older youth can participate at the recommendation of their parent or employer.

 

The six sessions will include Introduction: Overview of agriculture, types of risks, and regulations related to agricultural safety and health; Safety Basics: Youth safety and risk, appropriate clothing and personal protective equipment (PPE), warning signs, hand signals, and basic first aid; Agricultural Hazards: Hazards associated with machinery, animals, pesticides, electricity, confined spaces, and farm chemicals; The Tractor: Comprehensive overview of the tractor, including but not limited to tractor types, hazards, controls, lightning, and starting and operating a tractor; Connecting and Using Implements with the Tractor: Various types of implements, such as drawbars, three-point hitches, and how they are connected and used with the tractor; and Materials Handling: Skid steers, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), and utility vehicles.

 

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Orders (AgHOs) regulation prohibits 14 and 15-year-olds from operating farm tractors and attached powered equipment unless (1) they are working on a farm owned/operated by their parent or legal guardian, or (2) the youth has successfully completed an approved safe tractor and machinery operation-training program.  General information regarding tractor and machinery certification for Extension educators, high school ag instructors, parents, and employers can be found at http://agsafety.osu.edu/programs/tractor-machinery-certification-program.  Education and training on safe operation is always encouraged, even if it is not legally required.


Registration for the Tractor Safety and Machinery Operation course for Youth needs to be completed by January 18 by calling the Hardin County Extension office at 419-674-2297 to ensure enough time to order manuals.  The cost to participate is $40 for the course, which includes manuals, handouts, certification card, and refreshments.  The course will be taught by Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Educator Mark Badertscher with possible assistance from Hardin County Agricultural Education Instructors and Farm Bureau members.  There may be possible scholarships provided by the Hardin County Farm Bureau.  Preference for enrollment will be Hardin County youth, but young people from other counties will be encouraged to enroll with a limit of 25 students.

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OSU Extension To Host Agronomy Webinars

Ohio State University Extension announces a series of four webinars available to producers, Certified Crop Advisers, and industry offered throughout January and February 2017.  The Corn, Soybean and Wheat Connection series is scheduled to begin on January 24, 2017 and will focus on issues and updates in grain crop production.  Each webinar will begin at 7:00 p.m. and can be viewed at several host sites across the state or from your home computer.  Certified Crop Adviser credits will be available each evening at physical locations only.

 

The first session on January 24 will feature Dr. John Fulton and Dr. Elizabeth Hawkins on how to efficiently utilize data from precision agriculture technology to guide farm management decisions.  The second webinar will be held on January 31 and will detail how to assess growing conditions and their impact on ear rots, mycotoxins, and malformation in corn.  This session will be taught by Dr. Peter Thomison, state Corn Production Specialist, OSU Extension and Dr. Pierce Paul, state Corn and Wheat Disease Specialist, OSU Extension.  This January 31 Corn Production and Diseases webinar will be hosted by the Hardin County Extension office, sponsored by Farm Credit Mid-America located in Bellefontaine.

 

The third webinar will be held on February 21 and will cover improving soil health and utilizing cover crops by Dr. Steve Culman and Dr. Ryan Haden, both from Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster.  The final webinar on February 28 will give producers management strategies to increase soybean yield and provide updates on insect trends from 2016.  This session will be taught by Dr. Laura Lindsey, state Soybean & Small Grains Specialist, OSU Extension and Dr. Kelley Tilmon, state Field Crops Entomology Specialist, OSU Extension.

 

Participants can register to view at host locations by contacting the host directly.  Find a host location near you and a full schedule at go.osu.edu/cswconnection2017schedule.  If you prefer to view the webinars at home, you must pre-register one week before each session to receive login information.  You may register online at go.osu.edu/cswconnection2017.  If you are interested in viewing the webinars at the Hardin County Extension office, contact Mark Badertscher at 419-674-2297 or badertscher.4@osu.edu.  These webinars are on outreach tool of the OSU Extension Agronomic Crops Team.  Each webinar will be recorded and available online one week after the live session.  The location of the recordings will be announced in the C.O.R.N. Newsletter and published at agcrops.osu.edu.  To subscribe to the newsletter, visit corn.osu.edu.

 

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Conservation Tillage Club Breakfast Series Planned

The 2017 Conservation Tillage Club breakfast program series will begin on Tuesday, January 10 at the Plaza Inn Restaurant in Mt. Victory.  Each session will start at 7:30 am with complimentary buffet breakfast followed by the program at 8:00 am.  Other sessions will be held on January 24, February 7 and 21.

 

On January 10, the program will feature Dr. John Fulton, Precision Ag & the 4Rs.  Fulton is from The Ohio State University, Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering.  Fulton has been a national leader in Precision Agriculture, doing research in this area.  His work has him studying drones and aerial imagery to help make management decisions with crop production.  He has also been using variable rate technology and multi-hybrid seeding in plots around Ohio.  He is working on compaction studies and its effect on yields.  His presentation at the Conservation Tillage Club breakfast will focus on using precision ag to determine fertilizer needs and then using equipment technology available to farmers to get the right source of fertilizer applied at the right time, using the correct rate, and the proper placement.

 

The January 24 program will feature Dr. Jeff Stachler, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Educator in Auglaize County.  Stachler received his Ph.D. in Weed Science and has worked out of state before coming back to Ohio to serve as a county extension educator.  Stachler will address New Weed Control Options such as the Roundup Ready 2 Xtend program and other new pesticide programs to help farmers control problem weeds such as marestail, giant ragweed, waterhemp, and Palmer amaranth.  His talk will discuss using fall or spring burndowns, pre-emerge, post-emerge, and use of residuals to help control problem weeds in soybeans and corn.

 

February 7 Cal Whewell will speak to the Conservation Tillage Club.  He will be presenting the Grain Marketing Outlook, providing area farmers with grain marketing strategies.  Whewell is no stranger in grain marketing circles.  He is a Risk Management Consultant and Regional Director at FC Stone, serving the Toledo area.   FCStone Inc. provides clients across the globe with a comprehensive range of customized financial services and tools to help them protect their margins and manage volatility.  A pioneer in specialized financial services, they open markets for underserved mid-market clients with insight, guidance and access.

 

The February 21 program will feature Steve Baker, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) State Soil Scientist speaking about Soil Health.  Baker is a well-known expert on soil health, speaking to audiences about the importance of building soil quality to maximize fertility and improve crop production.  He will discuss various conservation practices that build soil health, while at the same time protect natural resources such as our land and water.  Some of his resources include unlocking the secrets of the soil, soil health and sustainability, and discovering soils from the ground up.  Attendees will gain knowledge of how they can improve their soils, while protecting this most important resource.

 

The Conservation Tillage Club breakfast program series is jointly sponsored by OSU Extension and the Soil and Water Conservation Districts of Hardin, Logan, and Union Counties, and in cooperation with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.  Breakfast is provided by the generous support of agricultural lenders and agricultural businesses.  All events are open to the public and no advance registration is required.  Continuing education credits for Certified Crop Advisers is pending.


For more information about OSU Extension, Hardin County, visit the Hardin County OSU Extension website at hardin.osu.edu, the Hardin County OSU Extension Facebook page or contact Mark Badertscher, at 419-674-2297.

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New Animal Drug Laws Begin With New Year

The Veterinary Feed Directive will go into Effect on January 1, 2017 or sooner. There will be changes to the way Over-the-Counter drugs can be used with livestock. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) amended the distribution and use of Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) drugs and animal feeds containing such drugs.  So what do these federal regulatory changes mean to you and your livestock operation? Well, According to the FDA, the VFD is a “written (nonverbal) statement issued by a licensed veterinarian in the course of the veterinarian’s professional practice that orders the use of a VFD drug or combination VFD drug in or on an animal’s feed”.

 

How does a Veterinary Feed Directive work?  This written statement authorizes the owner of and caretaker the animal(s) to obtain and use animal feed bearing or containing a VFD drug or combination VFD drug to treat the client’s animals only in accordance with the conditions for use approved by the FDA.

 

Examples of drugs or products classified as “VFD” are Aureomycin 4G Crumbles (contains chlortetracycline), Scour-Ease Medicated (contains neomycin and oxytetracycline), SAV-A-CALF Scours & Pneumonia Treatment (contains neomycin sulfate and oxytetracycline), and Calf Medic Plus (contains neomycin and oxytetracycline).

 

Examples of drugs or products classified as “prescription” are L-S 50 Soluble Powder (contains lincomycin and spectinomycin), Sulfamed-G Soluble Powder (contains sulfadimethoxine), Di-Methox Soluble Powder (contains sulfadimethoxine), and Strike III Type B Medicated Feed (contains hygromycin B).


So what are the changes to drugs that livestock producers may have used in the past to manage the health of their livestock?  To be VFD, drugs that you may have purchased in the past as over-the-counter to be included in your feeding program(s) will now require a Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) from your Veterinarian of Record with whom you have a valid Veterinary-Client-Patent-Relationship (VCPR).  If you are planning to continue using the drug(s) listed as a VFD in your feeding program, a VFD for each drug is required to be able to buy the drug or product.  VFD drugs must be followed exactly as per label.  

 

To be prescribed, all water soluble antibiotic and sulfa products that were labeled for administration via water will require a written prescription from your Veterinarian of Record with whom you have a Veterinary-Client Patent-Relationship (VCPR).  Livestock producers would need to have the VCPR to be able to buy these drugs or products.  

 

Cattle, swine, sheep, and poultry as well as other food producing species such as honey bees, fish are included in these new rules from the Food and Drug Administration.  These new changes become effective January 1, 2017 or sooner, depending on when the manufacturer changes the labeling.  Some suppliers that were able to sell these drugs or products in the past may not be able to sell them after January 1, 2017.  Consult your veterinarian for more information or call or OSU Veterinary Extension at 614-292-9453 if you have further questions about how these changes may affect your livestock operation.

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OSU Extension Hosting New, Small Farm College

Are you a small farm landowner wondering what to do with your acreage?  Are you interested in exploring options for land uses but not sure where to turn or how to begin?  Have you considered adding an agricultural or horticultural enterprise but you just aren’t sure of what is required from an equipment, labor, and/or management perspective?  Are you looking for someplace to get some basic farm information?  If you or someone you know answered yes to any of these questions, then the Ohio State University Extension New and Small Farm College program may be just what you are looking for.

 

Ohio State University Extension of Auglaize and Hardin Counties will be hosting the New and Small Farm College this winter.  New and Small Farm College is an eight session short course that will be held one night a week on Thursdays, starting January 19 and ending March 9.  In case of inclement weather, March 16 will be a makeup session.  The New and Small Farm College will be held at the OSU Lima Campus in Galvin Hall – Room 124, 4240 Campus Drive, Lima.  Each session will start at 6:00 PM with a light dinner followed by presentations beginning at 6:30 PM and concluding at 9:00 PM.  To obtain a copy of the brochure for registration, visit hardin.osu.edu or stop by the Extension Office.  All registrations will need to be sent to Ohio State University Extension – Clinton County.

 

Topics that will be covered in the New and Small Farm College course include: Getting Started (goal setting, family matters, business planning, budgeting, resources); Appropriate Land Use (walk the farm); Sources of Assistance (overview of county resources such as OSU Extension, government agencies and programs, CAUV, EQIP grants); Legal, Insurance, Business Structure (fence laws, liabilities, insurance needs); Natural Resources (forestry, timber marketing, wildlife,

ponds, etc.); Financial/Production Record Keeping and Taxes (balance sheet, record keeping methods); Marketing Alternatives (direct marketing, cooperatives, agri-tourism, bed and breakfast, niche markets); and Extension/Table Top Discussion (enterprise exploration of livestock and horticulture opportunities).  An additional small farm tour is being planned as part of the course.

 

One past participant of the New and Small Farm College said, “I recommend this program to anyone starting or thinking about farming in any area.  The amount of knowledge presented was priceless.”  


The cost of the course is $150 per person, $100 for an additional family member.  Each participating family will receive a New and Small Farm College notebook full of the information presented in each class session plus additional materials.  Registrations are now being accepted through January 2, 2017.  Register early as space is limited!  For more details about the course and/or a registration form, contact Jeff Stachler at 419-739-6580 or stachler.1@osu.edu or Mark Badertscher at 419-674-2297 or badertscher.4@osu.edu.

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Four Industry Leaders Inducted to Hall of Fame

Change occurs constantly. If you resist it, you lose. If you accept it, you survive, and if you manage it, you succeed. This was the message of keynote speaker Edison Klingler who is a retired OSU Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Agent of Hardin County. Klingler spoke on the various changes in Agriculture since the time Extension came to Hardin County in 1918. Klingler looked back on the history and advancements made by Hardin County Extension and farmers.

 

From Left Front: Dr. Bruce McPheron, Stephanie Jolliff (Back) Mark McCullough, Steve McCullough, Mark Rose.
 

Four agricultural leaders were inducted into the Hall of Fame, first was Ridgemont High School Agriculture Education Instructor and FFA advisor, Stephanie Jolliff. Jolliff started at Ridgemont High School in 2005 and has led members to numerous state and national awards. Her personal achievements include being the first to be named the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s Woman of the Year, Being honored by the Ohio Farm Bureau, and serving on numerous committees and in many organizations. Jolliff’s past students noted that she was extremely innovative in the classroom and helped students and peers find their paths in agriculture.

 

Stephanie Jolliff Accepting her award.

 

The late Wright McCullough who is known as an inventor and farmer to the Hardin County area was inducted next. As the founder of McCullough industries, Wright always said “Find a need, build a product to fit that need.” according to Grandson Dustin that presented the award. McCullough is known for many things, some of which include inventing a complete feed mixer, and the Wright Self Dumping Hopper, which are produced in Hardin County and travel worldwide.

 

Steve McCullough accepting his father's award on behalf of his family.

 

Known as “A Buckeye and a bug guy” Dr. Bruce McPheron, the Ohio State University Provost and Executive Vice President was honored next. Dr. McPheron was formerly a professor of Entomology (the study of insects) at both Penn State University and The Ohio State University where he has researched insect pests. McPheron was also the Dean of the College of Agriculture at Penn State and Dean of the College of Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State.

 

Dr. Bruce McPheron giving his acceptance speech.

 

Finally, Mark Rose, who is the Director of the Financial Assistance Program for the Natural Resources Conservation Service or “the money man of the NRCS” was inducted. Rose makes sure that NRCS programs are implemented across the country. Rose was a member of the Kenton FFA Chapter and a member of Hardin County 4-H. He addressed the FFA members in the room, saying “Don’t be afraid to go out, but don’t be afraid to come back.” Citing his roots in Hardin County and how working on a farm from a young age helps him daily in Washington D.C.

Mark Rose accepting his award.

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New Regestration Deadline for 2017 Beef Exhibators

According to the Hardin County OSU Extension office, This year the County Fairboard will require all steers, dairy steers, and market heifers being exhibited in the 2017 Hardin County Junior Fair show, to be registered.  The County Extension Office will handle the registration. All animals must be registered by December 28, 2016. This deadline will be strictly enforced.

 

The Tag-in/Weigh-in Day for the market steers, dairy steers & market heifers will be December 31st, 2016 from 10:00am to 12:00pm at the Hardin County Fairground’s beef barn. All market steers, dairy steers & market heifers that are entered to show in the 2017 Fair are required to be tagged. At the time of tagging, the Jr. Fair member will have the option to have their animals weighed to be eligible for the Rate of Gain Contest.

 

The Hardin County Cattle Producers will furnish the tag for the first 2 market steers, dairy steers & market heifers entered for each Jr. Fair member. Any additional animals tagged will be at the cost of the Jr. Fair member.  The Jr. Fair Exhibitor will be given a copy of their weights to be put with their records.

 

The market beef registration form, is to be returned to the Extension Office by December 28, 2016. Registration will not be accepted without the 4-H or FFA Advisor's signature (or email verification), parent's signature, and member's signature.

 

You may register as many market beef as you own and are keeping records on as a part of your 4-H or FFA project.  Two registered animals can be entered in the Market Beef Class at the Fair. Market beef shown at the Ohio State Fair will be required to have a DNA hair sample on file in Columbus by January 15th.  Four market beef animals can be nominated to show.

 

To obtain more information, contact the Hardin County OSU Extension Office at (419) 674-1197.

 

Click Here For The Registration Form

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Kenton FFA Member Receives American FFA Degree

From the Kenton FFA chapter Morgan Bloom received her American FFA degree.This is the highest degree that a member can be awarded. Morgan has accomplished all of the following requirements. She has received a state degree. Morgan has been an active member for the past three years and has a record of satisfactory participation in chapter and state activities. She has completed the equivalent of at least three years of instruction in an agricultural education program. Morgan has graduated from high school at least 12 months prior to the national FFA convention at which the degree is to be granted. She has an outstanding SAE, which demonstrates good planning, managing and financial experience .She has earned $10,000 and productively invested at least $7,500, or has earned and productively invested at least $2,000 and worked 2,250 hours in excess of scheduled class time. She has also done 50 hours of community service. Morgan also has a record of outstanding leadership and have achieved a high school record of “C” or better. Morgan made all of her American FFA degree money farming a piece of land and using the money made towards the degree. She has been recognized for her accomplishments during National and State Convention. She was also recognized at last year's Kenton FFA banquet.

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Kenton FFA Attends National Convetion

During the 89th Annual National FFA Convention and Expo in Indianapolis, Indiana. The Kenton-OHP FFA Chapter was recognized on stage for receiving a “Three Star Chapter” award. This award is given to chapters that have an annual Program of Activities that includes a series of activities which encourage members to grow as individuals and to serve others. Out of 7,757 chapters in the country, only 173 chapters are awarded this honor. Also while on this trip, students toured the Maria Stein Grain Company they learned the process of maintaining nutrition rations in feeds and new government regulations in the animal nutrition industry. The members also toured Elanco animal health where they learned how to properly use social media and successful interview techniques. At the convention, students attended sessions where they were heard from Diana Nyad, an Author and record holding long-distance swimmer. Members also heard from Jason Brown, an ex-football player that left the National Football League to farm. Members also had the opportunity to explore the Career Show and Shopping Mall. This expo has stands from a variety of colleges and also had presentations of new farm equipment. Students were then treated to a Cole Swindell and Chris Young concert. For updates on the Kenton FFA Chapter, Like them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter!

 

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Extension Rainfall Report for Growing Season Released

With the help of fifteen volunteer rainfall reporters, the Hardin County Extension office has collected unofficial township rainfall data for the past twenty-four consecutive years.  The 2016 growing season started with a drier April that enabled some farmers to begin planting corn, before May brought wet conditions and cool temperatures, halting corn planting around the county.  A few soybean fields were also planted early, with limited progress in growth.

Rainfall amounts started to lessen after May 15 after going through a cool, wet period of about 3 weeks.  Along with less rainfall later in May, the county experienced warmer temperatures.  This allowed the soil to dry and provide better conditions for planting corn and soybeans.  Earlier planted crops that didn’t emerge because of cooler temperatures, emerged after this warmer weather.  This change in the weather also allowed for farmers to resume planting under more favorable conditions.

June started out dry until two rain events hit Hardin County late in the month.  Some fields experienced ponding and flooding in low areas, areas with compaction, and other hard to drain soils.  Crops in these areas were destroyed or stunted due to drowning out smaller plants and root systems where water laid for more than two days.  Soil moisture was good coming off a very heavy rain event in late June leading into the month of July.  However, that moisture could only last so long with the growing crops as July signaled the beginning of an extended dry period.  

Much needed rain occurred in August after the extended dry period that started in July.  The hot and dry weather during this period had an adverse effect on corn ear development and kernel fill.  Soybean fields utilized the extra rain in August to provide additional growth and produced new flowers that added pods to shorter plants.  September and October weather was favorable for fall harvest.  Because of the good weather, harvest was completed early again this year, with most fields being done by November.

During the growing season, from April 15 through October 15, average rainfall was 21.21 inches.  This is 2.43 inches below the ten-year average growing season precipitation, and 3.49 less inches of rain than last year’s growing season.  The most rainfall recorded during the growing season was 31.30 inches in Hale Township by Ramsey Farms.  The least amount of rain was recorded in Liberty Township by Phil Epley, with 18.09 inches for the season.  A wide range of 13.21 inches in rainfall accumulation from high to low across the county is an indication of the variability in rainfall throughout Hardin County in 2016.

Corn yields were inconsistent depending on the area rainfall, and when it arrived on area corn fields.  Several fields had lower yields due to smaller ears and incomplete kernel fill.  However, moisture levels in corn were fairly dry at harvest time, reducing the need for running grain dryers as much as some years.  Overall lower corn yields for the growing season were also accompanied with lower corn prices.  Because soybeans will adapt better to weather, the August rains helped increase yields with this crop.  Soybean prices were steady and aided by better yields for the crop compared to other years.  Winter wheat acres planted this fall in the county were growing well with the warm weather and should have ample tiller growth to survive the winter.  Herbicide, fertilizer, lime, and manure applications have also been done in selected fields.  Much fall tillage has happened around the county with some tiling operations still in progress.

 

Hardin County Extension Rainfall Report for October 1-15, 2016 (recorded in inches)

Township

Reporter

October

1-15

2016

Growing Season (from Apr. 15-2016)

Blanchard Township

Crop Production Services

0.40

19.36

Buck Township

Heritage Cooperative/Kenton

0.05

19.04

Cessna Township

Steve Lowery

0.04

20.36

Dudley Township

Dale Rapp

0.05

23.96

Goshen Township

Brien Bros. Farm

0.60

19.91

Hale Township

Travis Ramsey

0.55

31.30

Jackson Township

Jim McVitty

0.94

21.26

Liberty Township

Phil Epley

0.93

18.09

Lynn Township

Jan Layman

1.55

22.05

Marion Township

Mark Lowery

1.08

23.10

McDonald Township

Jerry Stout     

1.12

20.78

Pleasant Township

Robert McBride

0.50

19.11

Roundhead Township

Mike Lautenschlager

0.65

20.95

Taylor Creek Township

Silver Creek Supply

1.22

20.06

Washington Township

Randy Preston

0.23

18.79

 

Average

0.66

21.21

 

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Riverdale FFA Hosts Leadership Night

The Riverdale FFA Chapter recently held a leadership night for surrounding FFA Chapters. Johnathon Cottingim State Sentinel and Ryan Matthews State Vice Presidents at large came to do little workshops with all of the FFA members.  The two State officers talked about how people have and can use their potential to have success in their lives. After the workshops members enjoyed a taco bar and played some games including: dodgeball, corn hole, and different card games.

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Riverdale FFA Competes in Food Science Contest

Four Riverdale FFA members made up a team and competed in the District Food Science Contest.  The team consists of Carrol Pauley, Cara Pauley, Kohlten Shane, and Hunter Shane. The Food Science contest simulates learning activities related to the food industry and allows the team to develop and market a new product. The team traveled to Sentinel Career Center in Tiffin for the contest. The team placed 2nd in the District and will be competing in the State competition on December 3, 2016. Carrol Pauley placed 3rd individually.  

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Ag Hall of Fame to Induct New Members

The Hardin County Agriculture Hall of Fame has announced the 2016 honorees to be inducted at the fourteenth annual Agriculture Hall of Fame recognition banquet.  The 2016 inductees include: Stephanie Jolliff, Wright McCullough, Bruce A. McPheron, and Mark A. Rose.  The banquet will be held on Tuesday, December 6th, beginning at 6:30 pm at St. John's Evangelical Church on East Carrol Street in Kenton.  The public is invited to come to honor these inductees and their families, and to recognize their many accomplishments.

 

The purpose of the county Agriculture Hall of Fame is to recognize outstanding agricultural contributions by Hardin County people and to honor those who have brought distinction to themselves and the agricultural industry.   Edison Klingler will present the keynote address.  Klingler served as the Hardin County Extension Agent for Agriculture, Community & Natural Resources from 1962 until his retirement in 1988.  He currently remains active on several Hardin County committees, benefiting both the citizens and programs within the county.

 

 

Stephanie Jolliff graduated from Cardington High School in 1992.  She attended The Ohio State University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in 1996, Master of Science Degree in 2002, and is currently a PhD candidate.  Jolliff is the agricultural education instructor and FFA advisor at Ridgemont High School, where she is a leader in the state and nation in agricultural education.  She has been presented the Franklin D. Walter Educator Award in 2010, 2011, and 2013.  Her FFA members have been lead to win numerous state and national proficiency awards, degrees, and career development events.  She has served as the advisor to multiple Ohio and National FFA Model of Innovation Chapter Awards.  Under her leadership, the Ridgemont FFA Chapter has been named a Top 10 Chapter in Ohio for several years in a row, including being named the top chapter in Ohio for two years straight.  Some of her professional awards include being named the Ohio Department of Agriculture Woman of the Year, The Ohio State University Alber Enterprise Center Award for Outstanding Achievement and Excellence, and the Ohio VFW High School Teacher of the Year.  

 

Jolliff is married to her husband Tom, who also is an agricultural education instructor and FFA advisor.  Together they have three children and operate a family farm.  In 2015, Stephanie Jolliff was awarded the Ohio Farm Bureau Cooperative Agriculture Educator Award.  Her accomplishments also include the Ohio Fuel Up to Play 60 Program Advisor of the Year, Girl Scout Women of Distinction Award Winner, and advisor for the Hardin County Chamber & Business Alliance Community Service Award winning organization, the Ridgemont FFA.  She has served as the Ohio Association of Agricultural Educators President, Ohio Assessment for Educators Test Materials Review Committee, Ohio Teach Ag Campaign Task Force Member, Ohio FFA Board of Directors, Ohio Small Grains Youth Agricultural Advisory Board, and the National State Farm Project Ignition Grant Review Committee.  She also has membership in the Ohio Farm Bureau, Ohio Education Association, and the National Maine Anjou Association.  

 

Wright McCullough graduated from Mt. Victory School after being a student there for 12 years.  He was married to his wife Norma until he passed away in 2000.  He was a farmer of 350 acres, John Deere machinery dealer from 1960-1964, and founder of McCullough Industries, Kenton in 1965.  In 1971, he was a co-founder of Golden Giant Buildings, also in Kenton.  McCullough was a pilot, flying many hours both private and commercial.  He served on the Hardin County Airport Board, and was a member of the Hardin County Farm Bureau and the Kenton Elks.  Described as a great businessman, Wright McCullough wasn’t afraid to buy and sell anything or build a product and sell a product.  He was always inventing something to manufacture, including some of the first TV antenna towers to show up in the rural community.  These towers were up to 50 feet tall, built in one piece, and delivered to area farms.  He believed he could build anything, finding a need and then building a product to fill that need.

 

Some of McCullough’s earliest inventions included a complete feed grinder and mixing system.  This system combined grain with supplement and silage that was mixed in a self-propelled delivery system.  This was a T.M.R. (total mixed ration) feed grinder/mixer before anyone else had built one.  He also built the first quick-attach manure loader in the area.  Manufactured here in Kenton during the 1960s, they were distributed through Dunham Lehr Corporation.  These loaders were shipped all over the United States and Canada.  During that same time, Wright McCullough also developed a line of tractor-mounted grader blades.  One of the innovations in these blades was their ability to tilt, enabling the blade to cut ditches or grade slopes.  Some of these blades can still be found on farmsteads around North America.

 
 

Bruce A. McPheron graduated from Kenton High School in 1972 after moving to Hardin County with his family during his junior year in 1970.  Previously, he attended Dublin High School from 1968-70.  During his time in Hardin County, he met his wife Marilyn.  He received his Bachelor of Science Degree from OSU in 1976 with honors, his Master of Science Degree in 1980 from the University of Illinois, and his PhD in 1987 also from the University of Illinois.  He has served most of his career as a professor of Entomology, doing research and teaching.  He became Dean of Agricultural Sciences at Penn State University and then a similar position at The Ohio State University.  After 40 years in agriculture, he is now providing leadership to the entire Ohio State University as Executive Vice President and Provost.  McPheron got his start as a 4-H member, winning a national 4-H scholarship in Entomology while serving on the Junior Fair Board in Hardin County.  He did farm work for Howard Watkins and Justin Sherman, and still claims Hardin County as his home county.  

 

He later served three years as Clermont County Extension Agent, 4-H, before becoming a researcher and teacher of Entomology at PSU.  There he supervised graduate degree programs in Entomology and Genetics.  He partnered to develop the procedure to identify and classify insects by their DNA, which is now standard procedure for accurate identification.  McPheron has received international recognition for his extensive national and international research of the medfly.  He has been recognized several times, including the Association of Public Land Grant Universities, where he has been elected chair to lead the APLU Research portfolio board, elected chair to lead APLU section of Administrative Heads of Agriculture, and elected chair of the APLU Policy Board of Directors.  Bruce McPheron has advocated before Congressional committees for Research in Agriculture on behalf of the APLU on two successive U.S. Farm Bills, and has a national and international reputation as a researcher, teacher, and now as an educational leader.

 
 

Mark A. Rose graduated from Kenton High School in 1978.  From there, he went on to college at OSU Agricultural Technical Institute where he received an Associate of Applied Science Degree in Crop Production Technology.  He then went on to earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Agriculture at The Ohio State University in 1983.  Using his experience growing up on a grain and cattle farm near Forest, he became the Assistant Farm Manager at OARDC Northwestern Branch in Hoytville.  Rose served as a  4-H club advisor and hosted a LABO international exchange student from Japan with his wife Darlene.  Together they have three children.  He was selected as a member of Class II of the Ohio Agricultural Leadership And Development (LEAD) program.  He then began his career with the USDA Soil Conservation Service, which was later renamed the Natural Resources Conservation Service.  He served both Logan and Wyandot Counties with these positions while managing the family farm.  His career with the NRCS branched out to Oklahoma, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. where he serves today as the Director of NRCS’s Conservation Financial Assistance programs authorized by Congress under the current Farm Bill.  These programs provide over 3 billion dollars of financial assistance to farmers and ranchers in all 50 states and U.S. territories to implement conservation practices on their farms.

 

Under Rose’s leadership in his current position, as Director of Conservation Financial Assistance Programs, the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) has become USDA’s largest land conservation program with nearly 80 million acres enrolled nationally since 2009.  He works closely with all NRCS State Conservationists, including the Ohio NRCS Conservationist to expand CSP in Ohio.  In 2004, Rose co-authored “Taking the First Step: Farm and Ranch Alternative Agriculture and Agritourism Resource Evaluation Guide.”  Locally, he has been a Farm Bureau member, advocating for Hardin County and Ohio Agriculture.  He has been a member of Rotary Club, Elks Lodge, Soil and Water Conservation Society, National Association of Conservation Districts, Association for Environmental Educators, and Senior Executive Service.  Throughout Mark Rose’s career, he has received several industry recognitions for his work in Ohio, Oklahoma, Maryland, and Washington D.C.

 

Tickets for the Hardin County Agriculture Hall of Fame Banquet must be purchased in advance through November 28.  Tickets are $12, and available at the Hardin County Extension office (419-674-2297) or from the committee members: Dustin McCullough, Robert McBride, Ruth Oates, Kerry Oberlitner, Paul Ralston, Don Spar, Luke Underwood, Robert Wood, and Mark Badertscher.

 

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County Corn Harvest Underway, Yields Better Than Expected

Local farmer Gary Shick harvests his corn crop.

 

I took a trip to the Western part of Hardin County to see this year’s corn harvest progress. Among reports of molded ears, sprouting kernels, and worm infestations around the state, Local Farmer Gary Shick says “We saw it earlier, I have seen some earlier samples of it in the earlier planted, April planted corn. We haven’t seen it so far...”

 
In regards to estimated yields, Shick says he’s “been talking with other farmers, I’ve heard anything from 120 to 240.”  That number is in bushels per acre. Shick says a common goal for his farm is 200 Bu/A however he’s attended meetings where in the west, they reach upwards of 500. Shick also says that this year’s crop is producing better than what he had anticipated.
 

Shick also showed me how technology has evolved in the field. His combine features a monitor that allows him to view yields and moisture content in real time. However technology in Agriculture extends far beyond that. Select machines now also have potential to steer themselves using GPS Guidance. Companies are also investigating machines that are autonomous or that don’t have a cab and are completely driven by way of computer. Stay tuned to WKTN and WKTN.com for the latest agriculture and FFA news.

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Area Represented Well At National FFA Convention

FFA Chapters from around the area returned this past weekend from the 89th Annual National FFA Convention and Expo that was held in Indianapolis Indiana. FFA members from across the country, attend the event to listen to motivational speakers, and to recognize achievements won by chapters and students. The convention also hosts national level contests and evaluations for proficiency awards. Jared McNeely, the president of the Kenton FFA Chapter explains the chapter’s high honor that they were awarded.

 

“We did get our three star chapter award and how we got that was we sent in our application for state and we were rated a gold chapter within the state, and then we sent that to nationals and got the three star chapter award.” McNeely said.

 

Only 10% of the state’s chapters are awarded the gold rating.  upon being awarded that honor, the chapter is then eligible for the Star Chapter Program. Kenton, Hardin Northern, and Ridgemont, share the three star title with 170 other chapters nationwide out of the collective 7,757 chapters in the country.

 

Chapters that are ranked with three stars are then eligible for the National Model of Innovation and National Model of Excellence awards. Ridgemont competed on stage for this award.


As far as individual awards go, Nole Gerfen of Ridgemont was awarded the top Swine Entrepreneurship proficiency award.

 

Stay tuned to WKTN.com and kentontoday.com for the latest FFA News.

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Reforestation and Wetlands The Topic of Annual Forestry Field Day

Reforestation and Wetlands The Topic of Annual Forestry Field Day

 

The Annual Forestry Field Day was held last night at the home of Kelly (Buck) and Jolene Buchenroth. They have planted over 7,800 Sycamore, Red, White Swamp, and Bur Oak trees on land that was previously unmaintained pasture and contained undesirbale weeds and undergrowth.

 

"The Buchenroth's have put in about 8 acres of new tree plantings as well as three wetlands. Two of which  are dugouts and one is a damed up wetland." Says District Conservationest Megan Burgess.

 

The project was funded through EQIP.

 

"EQIP stands for Environemntal Quality Incetives Program and it is a cost share program authorized through the 2014 farm bill. It helps provide funds to farmers and land owners to improve their natural resources whether thats cropland practices, wildlife practices, or livestock practices." Explained Burgess.

 

If you're interested in signing up for a program or getting technical assistance with your land, stop into the Hardin County Soil and Water office at 12751 SR 309 or call 419-673-7238 Extension 3.

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Kenton FFA Holds October Meeting

On October 11, 2016 the Kenton-OHP FFA chapter held its monthly October meeting.During the meeting the very first member of the month Sarah Thomas was selected.Also at the meeting Items of business such as fruit sale start and finish dates and the Trip to the Ohio State hockey were discussed and approved by the members of the Kenton-OHP FFA. After the items of business were handled members were treated to chili and pumpkin painting. All pumpkins painted were given to charity.

 

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Kenton FFA Hosts Industry Tour

On October 10, 2016 the Kenton FFA hosted their very first Hardin County Agriculture and Industry tour. During their day off of school students signed up to experience different aspects of agriculture in Hardin County. The first stop on the tour was a tour at Heritage Cooperative, a major crop company in Kenton Ohio. During this in-depth tour, the students saw the process of the crop treatment during the harvest season. Next, the students toured McCullough Industries. At the tour students got a first hand view of the process of providing quality material handing equipment. This was a good example of selling farm equipment in Hardin County. The next tour the students took was Powell Seeds in Ada. During this tour students learned the process of producing, processing and marketing Ohio grown seeds. While in Ada, students stopped for lunch at locally run restaurant Viva Maria. Finally, for their last tour students traveled back to Kenton where they toured International Paper. The tour featured the development of renewable and recyclable paper products that are used all around the world.

 

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County Ag Hall Of Fame Nominations Due

Applications are being accepted for the 2016 Hardin County Agriculture Hall of Fame through the end of the business day on October 14. Nominees must have made their major contribution to agriculture primarily as a result of being born, growing up, living in, or working in Hardin County, Ohio.  Outstanding agriculturalists may be nominated by individuals or organizations.  Nomination forms are available at the Hardin County OSU Extension office or on the Hardin County OSU Extension website at hardin.osu.edu.  Completed forms must be returned to the OSU Extension Office, 1021 W. Lima Street, Suite 103, Kenton, Ohio, 43326.


The purpose of the Hardin County Agriculture Hall of Fame is to recognize and honor outstanding contributions to agriculture by Hardin County people.  Annual awards will be made to men or women who have been instrumental to the success and excellence of agriculture, either as a farmer or in an agricultural related field.  We desire to honor and give public recognition to those who have brought distinction to themselves, have made outstanding contributions to their professions, and whose community involvement has served as a stimulus to others.  Selected individuals who have been instrumental to the success and excellence of agriculture will be honored at the Agriculture Hall of Fame Awards Banquet, scheduled for Tuesday, December 6, 2016.

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August Rainfall Report Released

During the month of August, Extension volunteer rainfall reporters received an average of 5.22 inches of rain.  The most rain for this month, 8.00 inches, fell in Hale Township as measured by Travis Ramsey.  The least rain reported during the month, 3.42 inches was reported in Buck Township by Heritage Cooperative/Kenton.  During the same month last year, an average of 2.50 inches of rain fell.  The rainfall recorded in August over the past ten years averaged 3.82 inches.  

For the growing season since April 15, the average precipitation in the townships was 17.43 inches, ranging from 25.35 inches in Hale Township to 14.72 inches in McDonald Township. The growing season average rainfall was 1.57 inches below the ten-year average for Hardin County for the same period.

Much needed rain occurred in August after an extended dry period that started in July.  The hot and dry weather during this period had an adverse effect on corn ear development and kernel fill.  This will most likely affect corn yields during harvest.  Soybean fields utilized the extra rain in August to provide additional growth and produced new flowers that added pods to shorter plants.  This August rain helped soybean development, including double cropped and inter-seeded fields around the county.  Hay producers were able to make cuttings through August as well with the timely rain.  Currently, fall harvest has just begun in the county with early soybeans and some corn shelling.

 

Township

Reporter

August 2016

Growing Season (from Apr. 15-2016)

Blanchard Township

Crop Production Services

3.76

16.51

Buck Township

Heritage Cooperative/Kenton

3.42

15.38

Cessna Township

Steve Lowery

4.87

17.87

Dudley Township

Dale Rapp

5.13

20.34

Goshen Township

Brien Bros. Farm

5.59

16.88

Hale Township

Travis Ramsey

8.00

25.35

Jackson Township

Jim McVitty

5.56

17.17

Liberty Township

Phil Epley

4.05

15.06

Lynn Township

Jan Layman

5.15

17.35

Marion Township

Mark Lowery

6.30

20.26

McDonald Township

Jerry Stout

4.97

14.72

Pleasant Township

Robert McBride

6.07

15.82

Roundhead Township

Mike Lautenschlager

5.70

16.75

Taylor Creek Township

Silver Creek Supply

4.22

15.53

Washington Township

Randy Preston

5.45

16.48

 

Average

5.22

17.43

 

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Hardin County Farm Bureau ATV Farm Tour Held

58 People were in attendance for the tour from as far away as Erie and Darke counties. While the participants drove the 30 mile route through Southeast hardin County, they learned about niche agricultural markets including maple syrup, honey, and deer. Those in attendance also learned about lumber and steel that are produced locally. In addition, the attendees learned about local Amish farms, the Pork industyr, and Community Supported Agriculture or a C.S.A. Also discussed was the EQUIP Grand program offered through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) office.

 

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Carcass Show of Champions Held Thursday Night

The show brings all of the grand and reserve champion animals carcasses into the slaughter house where they are evaluated for meat quality and was judged by Dr. Lyda Garcia, Assistant Professor of Meat Science and Meat Judging Coach at the Ohio State University. Dr. Garcia explains how she evaluates the animals. 
 
"It's more of a combination, for beef for example, we will take into account the yield grade. Yield grade is nothing more than external fat and muscling calculations. Then we take into account internal fat and hot carcass weight. In addition to that we also look at quality grade which consists of the age of the animal at the time of harvest and marbling score, so basically, the little white flecks of fat in the rib-eye, the more, the better and they will add more value to it." Said Garcia.
 
Garcia says she's very pleased with the quality that was presented to her.
 
"This is probably 15th or 16th [show] for the summer of 2016 and I'll tell you, my hardhat goes off to the participants. I saw some really good quality, really good conformation, a nice balance of lean muscle and back fat, so no complaints on my end, I'm very impressed." Garcia Said.
 
 
The results for the show are in the beef carcass show, Lane Underwood took first over Wyatt Daniels. In the hog lineup, it was Evan Thompson's Barrow, followed by Ross Thompson's Barrow, then Evan Thompson's Gilt, followed by Trenton Sparks's gilt.It was Madisyn Gossard over Mckala Grauel in the lambs. And to end the show it was Kaitlyn Long over Abigail Osborne with their goats.
 

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Water Quality Field Day Held In Northern Hardin County

Brownfield Ag News reports that the field day which was put on by the SWCD of Hardin County and Putnam County, OSU Extension, The Unites States Department of  Agriculture, and Ohio Department of Agriculture, was focused around keeping soil and nutrients in the ground and not letting farm chemicals get into the watersheds. Jerry McBride, the Chairman of the Hardin County Soil and Water Conservation District says the county had visitors from all over the state.

 

“The different groups of people were here and where they were from. We’re talking people from Williams County, Cleveland, Erie and Huron Counties, Columbus, Preble County, we’re talking people from all over the state, a fantastic day.” Said McBride.

 

McBride also says that the county’s best management practices are fairly new to the area.

 

“We in Hardin County, we like to be proactive, we look into some newer stuff. We don’t jump into everything or stuff off the wall or anything. We look into some newer practices like the two stage ditch. When we put that first one in that was kind of new to the Northwest Ohio area and the Lake Erie watershed. Indiana and Minnesota have done a few but that’s something we have to look at and every little thing that we can do helps clean up the water that leaves Hardin is cleaner for everyone else down stream and we are at the top of the Watershed.” McBride stated.


McBride said that he hopes that people understand that farmers and Soil and Water Conservation Districts are doing their part to solve the water issues. He says nobody truly knows the full answer but if they all collaborate, and do a little bit, it will all add up.

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